Posts Tagged ‘old chevy truck’

1960-1966 Chevrolet Hood Changes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1960 1966 hood changes 1

The two distinct styles of hoods during this seven year series (1960-1961 and 1962-1966) were each the same for Chevrolet and GMC except for one slight difference. The spot welded insert across the front (5″ x 82″) is a different stamping for Chevrolet than for GMC. This created a changed appearance with less expense!

Because of this different insert the two trucks have park light lenses that will not interchange. For economic reasons the 1960-1961 style hood was soon discontinued by GM. After the mid 1970′s, if the dealer ordered a 1960-1961 hood, he was sent the 1962-1966 style. It fit the older design truck perfectly.

For the non-perfectionist, all 1960-1966 GMC and Chevrolet hoods will interchange.

1960-1966 hood changes 2 1960-1966 hood changes 3 1960-1966 hood changes 4

1960-1966 hood changes 5 1960-1966 hood changes 6

Advanced Design Bumper

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1947-1955 years, pickup’s front and rear bumpers are different due to the shape of the body. Unfortunately, the front can be fit on the rear during restorations.

More of this occurs on trucks between 1951 to 1955 when rear bumpers became a factory option. Years later when the rear bumper is wanted, some people locate a more plentiful front and place it on the rear – and it fits.

Once the front is placed on the rear, it is so rounded that it hits the license plate position. Now the license get relocated so it can be seen. (One problem leads to another.)

advance design bumper 1

Correct Rear Bumper (above)

advance design bumper 2

Correct Rear Bumper (above)

advance design bumper 3

Rounded Front (above)

Fleet Side Steps

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

fleet side steps 1

The convenience of reaching cargo is ideal in a step bed pickup. The step between the cab and rear fender provides a place for the loader’s feet while reaching into the bed. Thus, this pickup is referred to as a ‘step bed.’

With the introduction of the fleetside box in the late 1950′s, there was no step. Placing cargo in the bed became much more difficult if added from the side of the bed. With some complaints, GM realized there was an opportunity to market a unique dealer installed accessory for this newer truck. A cast aluminum step was designed to actually fit into the fleetside sheet metal. Once the correct hole was cut in the bedside, the new step made access to cargo almost as easy as with the stepside. These were introduced in the mid or late 1960′s. They are a very rare item!

fleet side steps 2

fleet side steps 3

Safety Treads

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Without the rubber covering over the metal running boards like GM cars, trucks immediately show scratches from the driver’s shoes. This is frustrating to the restorer who has placed so much effort in repairing and painting these boards to pristine condition.

Fortunately, a solution exists! The original running board safety treads have been reproduced. These treads were a GM accessory and available from the dealers. They were marketed to help prevent a person from sliding off the running board if their shoe or the metal surface was wet. No doubt legs and arms were occasionally broken in this hazardous area.

Today, these safety treads still help prevent falls but also stop the unsightly scratches that occur during normal use. Most all full stocking dealers have them including Jim Carters Truck Parts.

The following is from a 1954 GMC accessories catalog. Their wording also tells the story in a full page ad.

test

1947-1955 Running Boards

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1947-1955 Advance Design years three different stock running boards on pickups and panel trucks were produced. Features such as width, number of ribs, thickness of metal, and length of under-braces are the same. When placed together, a difference in length is obvious.

The longest unit was used on the 1 ton pickup and panel trucks with 134′ wheelbase. The pickup bedside has four stake pockets and bed wood length of 107′.

A middle length running board is seen on the ¾ ton pickup (no panel trucks were that length) with 125 wheelbase. The bed side has three stake pockets and bed wood length of 85 3/4′.

The short running board is seen on 1/2 ton pickups, Suburbans, and panel trucks with 116′ wheelbase. The pickup bed side has two stake pockets and bed wood length is 76 7/8′.

When found off a truck at swap meets or in salvage yards, the running boards can be distinguished quickly by observing the number of holes where bolts connect the filler splash aprons. The 1 tons have 5, 3/4 tons have 4, and 1/2 tons have 3.

The adjacent photos are of un-restored running boards with no alterations.

1947 1955 running boards 1

1947 1955 running boards 2

1947 1955 running boards 3

1947-1955 Optional Wide Running Boards

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One of the most unusual and rare options for the 1947-1955 1/2 tons are ‘wide running boards’. The adjacent picture is from the 1949 Chevrolet Salesman’s Data Book. The photos below are of used original boards recently found at an Oklahoma swap meet.

They consist of ‘short’ running boards as used on all flat bed ¾ and 1 ton trucks plus a matching wide rear board extensions. The splash apron is totally redesigned to properly fill the different opening between the board and bed. See photo.

GM marketed these optional boards to allow more standing or foot room near the front of the ½ ton bed. Normally a person can not place his complete foot on a stock running board in this area. This option gave more comfort to the person spending much time on the running boards moving merchandise at the front of the bed.

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 1

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 2

1947 1955 optional wide running boards 3

New 1954 Radio

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In upgrading the Advance Design 1947-1953 cab for 1954, GM engineers created a totally different dash assembly. It required that the radio be much smaller. With better electronic technology and no push buttons, the new 6 volt radio could be placed into the smaller space. They even placed a cardboard sheet above the ’54 radio to protect it from settling dust over the years.

Yes, the 1954 Chevrolet and GMC had different designed dashes but each of their radios were similar and fit the smaller area. In the follow photos you can see the major differences between the 1947-1953 and the new 1954!

new 1954 radio 1

1947-1953 Radio/Weight 14.75 lbs (above)

new 1954 radio 2

1954 Radio/Weight 10.75 lbs (above)

new 1954 radio 3

1954 Radio, Side View (above)

1954-1955 Radio Blank Out

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

All 1954-1955 Chevrolet/GMC trucks came from the factory with a blank-out plate to cover where the radio would be installed. As this accessory was dealer installed the plate could be removed (probably thrown away) and the new radio added.

This blank-out plate and its two special clips has become very rare in recent years. They are not being reproduced. The enclosed photos show an original painted plate. The Chevrolet unit is the interior cab pearl beige color with a stamped bow-tie in black. GMC chose to not add their logo. These plates are just like Chevrolet except have a smooth surface with no trade letters.

1954 1955 radio blank out 1
Chevrolet (installed)

1954 1955 radio blank out 1

Chevrolet (above)

1954 1955 radio blank out 2

GMC (above)

1954 1955 radio blank out 3

Back View (above)

1954 Chevrolet Willys Radio

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

As more restorers become interested in the 1954-1955 Chevrolet truck, the demand for the correct factory accessories has increased demand. Trucks during these early years were used mostly for work and many owners ordered no accessories. Even the heater was often added later.

Though locating a restored or restorable factory radio is a difficult task, there is another source that might make the project more successful. The factory 1956 Willys radio #694866 is almost identical to the one in the 1954-55 Chevolet truck and both are 6 volt. The following does not affect fit and the appearance differences can be easily modified.

The Willys radio uses 1951-1953 Kiaser tuning knobs. These can be exchanged for excellent reproduction black knobs now made just for the truck radio.

The dial face does not have the current bow tie displayed on the glass. New glass dials are now available for the 1954-1955 Chevy truck radios.

The Willys radio does not have the speaker attached to its top. A small bracket can easily be fabricated to put the speaker in the correct spot for a Chevrolet. None of this is seen when positioned behind the dash on the truck.

And now the sad fact. If you thought the 1954-1955 Chevrolet truck radio was rare, imagine locating one from a 1956 Willys!

1954 chevrolet willys radio

Brake Cable

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The common practice of replacing the original differential with a newer high speed assembly usually brings up another question: How do I connect the late model brake cable to the original brake system?

As the ends of most GM cables terminate with a steel ball, they can easily attach to a brake line connector as used on later GM vehicles. See photo. The other end of this connector attaches to a threaded 1/4″ hook found at your local hardware store. A nut on the brake’s shaft can be adjusted to eliminate excess looseness in the cable when the brake is not being used. This easy attachment will give years of dependable service!

brake cable 1

Blazer and Jimmy Speakers

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One of the most unusual features of the 1967-1972 series of trucks is the unique placement of the 1969-1972 Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy radio speaker. Unlike the pickup, Suburban, and large trucks; the radio speaker is not under the top of the dash. In fact, the dash does not even have grille slots to allow sound to come from a speaker.

Because of the Blazer and Jimmy’s removable top, GM knew that some would occasionally be caught in the rain. This would quickly ruin a speaker that was in the traditional location. Thus, on the 1969-1972 Blazer and Jimmy only, the factory radio speaker is in the right side interior quarter upholstery panel behind the front seat. If the vehicle did not come with interior rear panels, the speaker was out of sight at the bottom edge of the dash.

blazer speakers 1

blazer speakers 2

Stainless Corner Bed Strips

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Stainless steel bedstrips are always a nice extra when you give your bedwood a clear finish. Not only do the strips look good but they retain this attractive appearance despite long term bad weather conditions.

However, a problem occurs when the owner wants corner bed strips in stainless. The original steel corners were welded in place to add bed strength where they joined the bed planks. Unfortunately, welding replacement stainless strips onto the bedsides will always have burn marks. It is just the way it is! Originally, cold rolled steel strips were welded in place at the factory and painted with the bedside.

Stainless does not successfully bond to paint, so the weld spots will always show on the new stainless strips.

The attached pictures show one of the most professional stainless corner welding jobs we have seen. The photos were taken a few days after attachment and before the bed sides were painted. They came by our shop that day for viewing. The owner, Howard Gillis of Stockton, MO is the proud owner of this excellent, evenly spaced welding project. Because they were spot welded in place, only stainless steel metal is on the surface of the welds.

Howard will soon go over these corner strips with a polishing wheel on an electric drill. This will not only put a shine on the welds but will quickly remove the brown burn spots as seen in the photos. The result should be show quality!

You can contact Howard Gillis at hcgillis@alltel.net

stainless bed strip 1

stainless bed strip 2

stainless bed strip 3

stainless bed strip 4

Radio Trivia

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

  • Push buttons were discontinued at the end of 1953 and did not reappear until 1967
  • Prior to 1959 radios used mechanical vibrator tubes. They would operate with either positive or negative ground. A low buzzing sound could always be heard from the tube area before the radio warmed up, once the sound began, the speaker made the buzzing difficult to hear. In recent years a major change has occurred. Vibrator tubes have been gradually replaced with a modern solid state style These are ruined if the battery is reversed. A positive ground tube cannot be placed in a negative ground vehicle
  • The 1947-1955 four staff cowl mounted antenna could be extended almost four feet. This helped pull in at least one station in rural areas
  • With a totally redesigned dash in 1954, the radio was given a major change. It remained AM only but with push buttons discontinued, it became almost half the size of the previous model
  • From 1959 and older, GM truck radios had two lead wires. One usually attached to the headlight switch so the dial light went on with the dash lights. The other wire attached to a 20 amp fuse and then to the ignition switch “hot” connection
  • The AM-FM radio was first available in GM trucks in 1970, not in 1967. These units have one sound track and are not stereo
  • In 1947, with the introduction of the Advance Design body style, GM trucks for the first time had a place in the dash to install a radio
  • In relation to wages, early radios were very expensive. A 1949 radio had a retail price of about $74.50 when it was difficult to carry $5.00 in groceries
  • The dash on the 1954-1959 GMC and 1955-59 Chevrolet has no place for a speaker opening. Thus, the factory speaker is placed between the sunvisors above the windshield

1953-1955 Side Mount Spare

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

side mount spare 1

During the Advance Design truck era, 1947-1955, most all spare tire assemblies were under the bed. Though not always convenient, this kept the extra tire away from the bed box and out of the way.

With encouragement to provide a more easy to reach spare tire, General Motors began offering a side mount unit in 1953. This continued, as an option, even through the later years of the GM step bed trucks.

This new option was added at the factory (not by the dealer) and included a steel frame attached to the left bed side. On the 1/2 ton, not the longer bed 3/4 ton, it was necessary to also have the rear fender with an indention at its front. This indention allowed the tire to be away from the cab and fit parallel to the bedside.

The indention on the 1/2 ton left fender was made no larger than necessary to allow for the mounting of the 6.00 x 16″ original tire. This spacing is so close that the current replacement 6.50 x 16″eplacement tire will sometimes not fit without touching either the cab or fender indention. This contact of the tire against the metal body and fender is not acceptable. The rubbing of a larger tire against the body or fender results in a squeaking noise and finally will wear through the paint. To prevent this, using a 6.00×16 tire may be necessary.

After the 1953 introductory year, it was discovered, the weight of the tire and mount could cause bed side and front bed panel separation (metal fatigue) on rough terrain. Therefore, in 1954 with the introduction of a redesigned stepbed, a small factory bracket was included with the spare tire option. This better held the left front of the bed side to the front bed panel.

An additional item of interest is found in the 1954 Chevrolet truck factory assembly manual. Due to the extra pounds of the added side spare tire and carrier weight, GM added a spacer (left side only) below the rear spring assembly. This helped keep the bed level even though the truck weighed more on the left. See the following Tire Carrier Instructions sheets.

side mount spare 2

side mount spare 3

Bedside Bracket (above)

side mount spare 4

Bedside Bracket Top (above)

side mount spare 5

Bedside Bracket in Place (above)

side mount spare 6

side mount spare 7

Rear Spring spacers for 1954-1959 side mount (above)

We also have two PDF files showing details of the side mounted wheel carrier.

Sheet 2 Model 3104 Click Here for PDF

Sheet 3 Models 3204, 3604, 3804 Click Here for PDF

1940 Tailgate Hinge

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In 1940, GM began offering a slightly wider bed on their Chevrolet pickups. This width increased from about 46 3/8″ to 48 1/2″.

Of course, the tailgate also required a width change. For some reason GM added a much larger horizontal tailgate roll on the top and bottom. Possibly for added strength. This caused the two hinges to also change. They were now much larger in diameter than the 1939, but this resulted in a new problem! Heavy weight on an open tailgate caused the oversize hinges to bend and split.

In 1941, the tailgate roll and hinge was reduced in diameter, though still larger than the 1939 and earlier design. This new size hinge remained through 1953.

1940 Tailgate Hinges

Solution to a problem: Pure 1940 tailgate hinges are not being reproduced. Even if you have a rare 1940 Chevrolet or GMC pickup with restorable original tailgate, your large hinges may be in very poor condition and not restorable. The solution is now on the market! A non-metal bushing is now available that fits over a 1941 hinge. This builds up the horizontal surface to equal that of a 1940.

1940-1946 GMC Metal Bed Bottom

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Though Chevrolet and GMC were usually close in their construction during the 1940′s, they were far apart in a few areas. GMC in particular advertised some of their major differences as being steps above the competition. One unique feature for GMC only is the corrugated metal bed bottom on their ½ ton and ¾ ton pickups between 1940 and 1946. Wood planks were not available during these years on their pickups.

Metal Bed 1

Metal Bed 2

The enclosed photos were taken during the bed bottom replacement of a 1946 GMC ¾ ton about 1990. The owner is Ed O’Reilly of Norwalk, N.Y. Ed would not compromise on the originality and thus a new bed bottom is shown being installed. He states it is not any more difficult than adding wood planks and strips. The right angle edge of the bottom welds to the bed sides just like the more conventional corner bed strips of a wood bed.

Metal Bed 3

Metal Bed 4

Metal Bed 5

1947-1955 Deluxe Panel Truck

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the first half of the Advance Design years (1947-1955), GM offered a special panel truck as an option. This deluxe model was designed for a company wanting to give a more upscale appearance to their retail customers.

During the era of one car families, the lady of the house looked more toward home deliveries for essentials. GM knew there was a demand for this type panel truck in nicer residential neighborhoods. They targeted stores and shops that provided home deliveries. With a relatively small investment GM added a chrome and stainless steel trim package that gave their pre-existing panel truck a very special look. The chrome grill and bumpers plus stainless trim around the windshield and side door windows was already being used on the deluxe pickup. GM then created some extras for their panel. Three horizontal strips at the lower edge of each fender, a long narrow horizontal strip toward the top of the front fender, and a stainless edging surrounding the two rear door windows added to the panels appearance. Wheels were body colored with three stripes, not black as on the standard model.

The slower selling one ton panel was also available with this deluxe option. This nicely appointed larger panel was right at home in new exclusive suburbs delivering carpet rolls, furniture, carrying pipe for the plumber, etc.

Production of these Advance Design deluxe panel trucks was ceased in mid to late 1951. Korean war shortages and the resulting high cost of stainless steel eliminated this optional package. After the war years this deluxe model with the many horizontal trim strips was introduced again as the 1954 through mid 1955. With limited production, the short lived optional deluxe panel truck is a very rare sight in today’s world. Locating the necessary parts to transform a standard panel to a deluxe model is now possible from Jim Carters Truck Parts.

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-50 1/2 ton Deluxe Panel (above)

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-50 1 ton Deluxe Panel (above)

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

1947-1955 deluxe panel trucks

For Panel models, this option includes bright metal reveals for side door windows, rear door windows and windshield; garnish moldings for side door windows; arm rest for driver’s side door, bright metal moldings for front and rear fenders, right-hand sun shade and chromium-plated radiator grille. (Not available on Canopy Express models or Carryall Suburban.)

Truck Beds…Black Wood

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Prior to 1941 in GM pickups, the bed wood of choice was oak. The change to yellow pine occurred at this time and it was used until the end of the wood bed floors in 1987. This southern yellow pine is a hard wood and should not be confused with softer white pine. It’s attractive pronounced grain stains and clear coats well. It’s planks, like oak, tends to warp when exposed to dampness, however, once secured in a pickup with bed strips it is there to stay!

For the perfectionist: originally, bed wood planks were not sanded smooth and varnished. Trucks were for work and the idea of bed wood with a furniture quality appearance was out of the question. Prior to 1955, bed wood planks were covered with black paint (excellent protection from water and sun). Beginning with the 1955 second series, they were given a protective weather seal and often sprayed body color over this.

Bed Images

truck bed Truck Bed truck bed
truck bed truck bed

Heater Control 1955-1959

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

heater control

Chevrolet and GMC cabs are basically the same during 1955-1959, however their dash boards differ. Thus, removable dash items such as guages, glove box doors, and radios will not interchange with Chevrolet. It seems it was a way GM divided the two marques using limited expense.

A major difference on the GMC dash is the long horizontal ridge at the lower edge door to door. Therefore, as the accessory fresh air heater was mostly the same in Chevy and GMC, the dash mounted control panels were different. GMC’s must have a hump in the lower half to go around this ridge. The two heater control levers must be 7/16 inches longer then Chevrolet. The upper half including the fan switch is the same on both brands.

This control panel on GMC has never been reproduced as fewer of these trucks were sold. Restorers must hunt for restorable originals. The longer levers are available from Jim Carter Truck Parts and a few full stock dealers.

Suburban Paint Colors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the beginning of the Advance Design years (1947-1949) new Chevrolet Suburbans were sold in one color combination; Channel Green (light) on the lower body and Fathom green (dark) on the upper.

Unless the customer paid extra for a specific paint such as for school bus use or a commercial paint color for a company, the two tone green was the color your received.

Beginning in 1950 this changed. Chevrolet began also offering 12 colors as on pickups and large trucks.

suburban paint colors 1

The following is from a 1950 Chevrolet announcement pamphlet showing changes in trucks that year

suburban paint colors 1

Early GMC Paint Schemes

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Since the introduction of GMC’s first 1/2 ton pickup in 1936, there has always been a sharing of most sheet metal parts with Chevrolet trucks. This was done mostly for economic reasons. However, when possible, each of the two brands tried to make inexpensive changes to be different than the other.

Some specific examples of this occurred during the Advance Design years (1947-1955). These two marques tried to stand apart from each other on most exterior features when it was financially possible.

Several very visible changes required no extra investment. Only a change in paint colors helped to separate the two trucks.

A. The running board splash aprons are one of the best examples. From 1947 through at least 1951 GMC painted these black. Chevrolet’s were the color of the cab and bed.

B. The front splash aprons on Chevrolets were body color. The GMC’s were black.

C. When the GMC carried a standard non-chrome bumper, it was black. Chevrolet did not offer black bumpers during any of the advance design years.

D. The names and shades of the exterior body colors are different. This was not difficult as Chevrolet and GMC were assembled in different assembly plants.

Note: We now find most restored Advance Design GMC’s have their splash aprons and bumpers painted the same color as the Chevrolets. As there are many more Chevrolets than GMC’s, people must assume that their GMC should be painted like a Chevrolet. The following factory GMC photos show a different story.

These factory photos provided, with permission, from the website www.oldgmctrucks.com

gmc paint 1

A. 1947-1951 GMC (above)

gmc paint 2

B. Front Splash (above)

gmc paint 3

C. Black Bumpers (above)

gmc paint 4

D. Paint Chart (above)

Advance Design Paint Colors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When observing un-restored GM trucks of the 1947-1955 era, one will notice the majority of these vehicles were originally dark green. An explanation is simple. Green was their standard color! If you did not specify one of the other approximately eleven non-extra cost colors, your truck would be delivered green.

The standard color of trucks had been though of as green since the late 1920′s on many brands. Though yellow, red, and orange was part of the non-extra cost GM paint options, they were mostly ordered by businesses that wished to gain attention or follow their company logos.

In the Advance Design years, conservative colors were the norm. The standard dark green was followed mostly by dark blue and black. Even maroon was seen on a limited number of GM trucks.

Hammered Paint

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During 1940-46 the Chevrolet trucks came standard with an unusual interior paint. It added a little extra appearance with minimum extra expense. This has been referred to as “Hammered Paint”. While drying this paint develops a fish eye appearance.

On these years of GM trucks all removable interior sheet metal is given this style paint. This includes the dash, door panels, and rear sheet metal. The specialty paint is available from Jim Carters Classic Truck Parts and a few other full stocking dealers.

hammered 1

hammered 2

hammered 3

Conservative Paint Early Trucks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In evaluating the available paint colors on 1946 and older GM commercial vehicles, one should keep in mind the general attitude toward pickups and large trucks during that era. Unlike today, customers bought and owned trucks for work! After five o’clock and on weekends most trucks were parked and the family sedan became the driver.

This relates not only to the lack of available GM truck options but also the very basic paint schemes. In fact, the standard color for General Motors trucks was a dark Brewster Green. They were sold this way unless you ordered one of the few non-extra cost optional colors. These were of special interest to commercial customers wanting a more visible truck or one that would fit in with their company’s color scheme. A few examples were: Swifts Red, Omaha Orange, Black, and Armour Yellow.

On the assembly line GM cabs and doors were painted bare (before any parts were added). This allowed all later attached interior sheet metal to be a separate color. This sheet metal such as the dash board, header panel , door panels, windshield post covers, and rear cab liner were even painted in a separate building and added to the cab on the line.

As a little extra touch, the interior metal was given a hammered appearance. This fish eye type paint is still seen today on new metal merchandise such as some brands of office equipment, etc.

Therefore, when you open the door of a correct 1946 and older truck, the seat riser plus floor edge and door frame are body color (painted with the cab). The removable sheet metal is the interior color.

The 1940-46 pickups and most all larger trucks were given a silver brown hammered appearance on inside to harmonize with all the factory exterior colors.

1936 Grille Housing

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1936 grill housing

After seventy years, authentic car and truck restorations are very difficult. With the limited survival of the 1936 GMC (the year of the company’s first ½ ton) this truck is especially difficult to restore just right.

Some literature has survived but what we see is usually in black and white. The question is the grill housing color of this rare truck. Chevrolet trucks and cars in those years have the housing painted body and hood color. We have found more than one GMC with this housing painted fender color. Very unusual! This was not even done on other non Chevrolet cars that are made by General Motors.

At this point we strongly suspect that the 1936 GMC had their shroud painted the color of their fenders. Only if the fenders were body color, would the shroud match the body and hood.

See the beautiful example in the photo above. It belongs to Pat Kroeger in Florida. During the recent restoration he attempted to paint the truck just right.

We hope to hear from you with comments on this difference in paint schemes. Contact us at info@oldchevytrucks.com or Pat Kroeger at du200@aol.com.

Interior Colors, Chevrolet 1940-46

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Serious early truck restorers often ask ‘What is the interior color of the original cab sheet metal parts, versus the exterior color?’ The answer for the 1934-46 trucks is simple.

The removable panels from the cab interior were always the inside color. If a component was welded in as part of the cab structure, it was sprayed the exterior color during the total cab painting.

This allowed successful coating of interior panels. As they could be placed flat during painting, there was a better guarantee of success for their specialty coatings. Wrinkle surface was placed on 1936-38 and a hammered appearance was used on most 1940-46 models.

Examples of these removable panels are the dash, rear interior corners, wiper covers, interior door panels, the above windshield cover, and upper door frames.

The outer cab color will also cover the seat riser and firewall as these were part of the total assembly. One exception is the rocker panels below the door. They are attached to the cab with screws but are the exterior color.

The two removable floor sections appear to be their own color, a black primer.

It is interesting that the interior colors in the finished new cab could have been painted even in different states and then the parts shipped to the assembly plant.

The following photos are of an all original 1941 Chevrolet truck interior.

exterior color 1

exterior color 2

rxterior color 3

exterior color 4

Paint Colors-The Early Years

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When observing un-restored GM trucks of the 1930-55 era, one will notice the majority of these vehicles were originally dark green. An explanation is simple. Green was their standard color! If you did not specify one of the other approximately eleven non-extra cost colors, your truck would be delivered green.

The standard color of truck had been thought of as green since the late 1920′s on many brands. Though yellow, red, and orange was part of the non-extra cost GM paint options, they were mostly offered by businesses that wished to gain attention or follow their company logos. Individuals usually did not order bright colors.

In the Advance Design years, 1947-55, conservative colors were the norm. The standard dark green was followed mostly by dark blue and black. Even maroon was seen on a limited number of GM trucks.

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

Two Tone Panel

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1955-1959 Chevrolet Task-Force truck years, the panel body style remained very popular. To help sales continue to grow, a two tone paint scheme was offered. This option was used for the business customer that planned on having their logo applied to the panel.

A wide band on the sides and back was painted Bombay Ivory*. This two tone paint looked very attractive, as is, when leaving the factory but it also provided the correct background for most company logos. The baked on factory ivory paint would hold up better and did not require sanding and painting by a body shop. Only a sign painter was needed to add the company logo.

two tone panel 1

The above drawing is from a page in the 1959 Chevrolet salesman’s data book. The two-tone paint is Dawn Blue with Bombay Ivory inserts.

The photos are of a local 25,000 mile 1959 panel truck also in Dawn Blue. Note how the white comes to a point at the top and bottom of the side door window opening.

* The Bombay Ivory inset was not offered on panels painted white.

two tone panel 2

two tone panel 3

two tone panel 4

two tone panel 5

two tone panel 6

1957 Chevy Primer Colors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

If you ever wondered about the color of the primer used by GM before the initial paint, these photos give the answer. This 1957 Chevy 1/2 ton had been polished through the paint in most areas. Of course, our question is: Why didn’t they stop polishing when the primer first appeared.

1957 primer 1

1957 primer 2

1957 primer 3

1957 primer 4

Engine Paint

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The following article used by permission of the writer: Robert Hensel, Technical Advisor Coordinator for the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America. Bob can be contacted by email: cacres@charter.net

I do not know of any book that gives the engine colors for all Chevrolets. I have found it here and there in many Chevrolet letters and books. I have come up with a list that covers most engines and some speculation, that does not mean that Chevrolet always followed what they said either.

The color of the fan is another sometimes sticky problem. As best as I know all replacement fans were black, we have some controversy in the early 30′s. Some pictures show the fan was pained engine color at the time of production. In the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America we do accept black and in my opinion black is what they should be. I think the engine for production was assembled and painted before the fan and other add-ons were added to the engine before it was put into the vehicle. The oil fill/breather tube is another case of engine color or black. I go with black.

Maybe this would be an idea for an article and maybe start some arguments. What we strive for in the VCCA is what the vehicle was like when new and offered to the public using only genuine Chevrolet parts available at the time of production. A good example that can cause hard feelings is white walls. They might have been available but Chevrolet did not offer them until the mid 30′s and I don’t think it was until 1962 or ’63 that you could order them on a truck. The dealer could install them but Chevrolet did not offer them, they would be after market items.

At times it is fun trying to find answers to the question but it can get frustrating when the answers are not to be found. I have a very large Chevrolet literature collection, and trucks are my main interest, but I can not always find the answers.

The vehicle listing from a 1923 Parts Price book does not cover the 1912 and 1913 Chevrolets, it does not list the T Truck for 1918 but they were built starting late 1917. The G series truck was Chevrolet’s first attempt at what we call a 3/4 ton truck. It was only built in 1921 and 1922. One more interesting thing in the list is the M series of vehicles of which there is a light delivery chassis listed. This was the ill fated copper cooled engine and only a very few cars were built before they were called back. There are at least two examples, both coupes that still exist and I know of at least one engine. As best as I know they never built any of the light delivery chassis for sale. What happened to the vehicles that were called back is still a mystery to me. I have heard they were dumped in Lake Michigan, or the were converted to water cooled cars. I heard they used the left over engines in lift trucks used in the plants in the late 20′s and early 30′s but never found any proof of this. The conversion idea sounds most logical. About the only exterior differences was the shell in place of the radiator. It had many horizontal louvers in it. The idea here is the 1 ton truck used the same engine as the light delivery starting in 1923. Before that the Light Delivery and the G truck used the 490 engine and the T used the F series engine that had a longer stroke.

Engine Colors

YEAR
ENGINE
COLOR
     
1912-1914 6 Cylinder Black*
1914-1923 4 Cylinder Gray
1924-1928 4 Cylinder Dark Green (gray green)
1929-1936 209 CID Blue Gray
1937-1953 216 CID Blue Gray
1941-1952 235 CID Blue Gray
1953 Truck 216 Blue Gray
1953 Standard Shift 235 Blue Gray
1953 Power Glide Blue
1953 Truck 235 Blue Gray
1954 Passenger Blue
1954 Truck 235 Gray
1954 Truck 261 Green
1955 Passenger 235 Gray
1955 Passenger V8 Orange
1955 Truck Thriftmaster 235 Gray
1955 Truck Loadmaster 235 Green
1955 Forward Control Loadmaster Gray
1955 Truck Jobmaster 261 Yellow/Green
1955 Truck Taskmaster 265 Yellow
1955 Truck Trademaster Gray
1956 Passenger 235 Blue*
1956 Passenger 265 Red
1956 Passenger V8 Orange*
1956 Thriftmaster 235 Green**
1956 Thriftmaster Special 235 Gray**
1956 Jobmaster 261 Yellow**
1956 Trademaster 265 Gray**
1956 Taskmaster Yellow**
1956 Loadmaster 322 Red
1957 Passenger 322 Blue**
1957 Passenger 265 V8 Chartreuse
1957 Passenger 283 V8 Red
1957 Truck 235 Green**
1957 Truck 261 Yellow**
1957 Truck 265 Gray** Different Options
1957 Truck 283 Gray-Yellow-Green-Black-Orange
1957 Truck 322 Red
1958 Passenger 235 Blue*
1958 Passenger 283 Orange*
1958 Passenger 348 Orange
1958 Truck 235 Gray***
1958 Truck 261 Green
1958 Truck 283 Light Duty Gray***
1958 Truck 283 Light Duty Green***
1958 Truck 322 Orange-Red
1958 Truck 348 Tan-Gray
1959 Passenger 235 Blue*
1959 Passenger 283 Orange*
1959 Passenger 348 Orange
1959 Truck 235 Gray
1959 Truck 261 Green
1959 Truck 283 Light Duty Gray
1959 Truck 283 Heavy Duty Green
1959 Truck 322 Orange-Red
1959 Truck 348 Orange
1960 Corvair Natural*
1960 Passenger 235 Blue*
1960 Passenger 283 orange*
1960 Passenger 384 Orange
1960 Truck 235 Blue Gray
1960 Truck 261 Green
1960 Truck 283 Trademaster Green
1960 Truck 283 Taskmaster Gray
1960 Truck 348 Gray
1961 Corvair Natural*
1961 Passenger 235 Blue*
1961 Passenger 283 Orange*
1961 Passenger 348 Orange
1961 Covair Truck Natural*
1961 Truck 235 Blue Gray***
1961 Truck 261 Green**
1961 Truck 283 Gray**
1961 Truck 348 Gray**
1962 Passenger 153 Orange
1962 Passenger 194 Orange
1962 Covair Natural*
1962 Passenger 235 Blue*
1962 Passenger 283 Orange
1962 Passenger 327 Orange
1962 Passenger 309 Orange
1962 Covair Truck Natural*
1962 Truck 235 Blue Gray**
1962 Truck 261 Green**
1962 Truck 283 Gray**
1962 Truck 327 Green
1962 Truck 348 Gray**
1962 Truck 409 Orange
1962 Diesel 212 Green
1962 Diesel 318 Green
1963 Passenger 153 Orange
1963 Passenger 194 Orange
1963 Covair Natural*
1963 Passenger 230 Orange
1963 Passenger 283 Orange*
1963 Passenger 327 Orange
1963 Passenger 409 Orange
1963 Covair Truck Natural*
1963 Truck 153 Gray-Orange*
1963 Truck 230 Gray-Orange*
1963 Truck 235 Blue/Gray**
1963 Truck 261 Green**
1963 Truck 283 Gray**
1963 Truck 292 Green
1963 Truck 327 Orange/Red
1963 Truck 348 Gray**
1963 Truck 409 Orange
1963 Diesel 212 Green
1963 Diesel 318 Green
1964 Passenger 153 Orange
1964 Passenger 194 Orange
1964 Covair Natural*
1964 Passenger 230 Orange
1964 Passenger 283 Orange*
1964 Passenger 327 Orange
1964 Passenger 409 Orange
1964 Covair Truck Natural*
1964 Truck 153 Orange
1964 Truck 230 Orange
1964 Truck 283 Orange*
1964 Truck 292 Green-Black-Gray*
1964 Truck 327 Orange
1964 Truck 348 Tan/Gray, Orange
1964 Truck 409 Gray
1964 Diesel 212 Green
1965 Passenger 153 Orange
1965 Covair Natural*
1965 Passenger 194 Orange
1965 Passenger 230 Orange
1965 Passenger 283 Orange
1965 Passenger 327 Orange
1965 Passenger 396 Orange
1965 Passenger 409 Orange
1965 Covair Truck Natural*
1965 Truck 153 Gray
1965 Truck 230 Blue
1965 Truck 250 Blue/Grat
1965 Truck 292 Green-Dark/Gray
1965 Truck 327 Green
1965 Truck 348 Gray
1965 Truck 409 Gray w/silver rocker cover
1965 Diesel 159 Green
1965 Diesel 212 Green
1965 Diesel 318 Green
1965 Diesel 351 Green
1965 Diesel 477 Green
1966 Passenger 230 Orange
1966 Passenger 250 Blue
1966 Passenger 283 Orange
1966 Passenger 327 Orange
1966 Passenger 396 Orange
1966 Passenger 427 Orange
1966 Truck 153 Gray
1966 Truck 230 Blue
1966 Truck 283 Blue/Gray
1966 Truck 292 Green-Dark/Gray
1966 Truck 327 Green- (Blue Suburban)
1966 Truck 348 Gray
1966 Truck 409 Gray
1966 truck 194 Gray/Blue

* Assumption

** Assumption because it is a carry-over from a previous year.

*** Assumption because it was found in next years book.

Disclaimer: Due to the fact that there is no official book that lists all the Chevrolets engine colors, many of these colors are assumption. Many of the colors in this list are taken from authenticated vehicles. Various assembly plants had different colors and tints. Colors were also subject to availability and these may have changed at the plant. Also different options on a vehicle would determine the color of the engine especially the truck 283 engine. Also remember the primary goal of the assembly plant was to get the vehicle out to the consumer. If a color was used up, the next available color was utilized.

Note: When Orange is stated, it means Chevrolet Orange.

Special Thanks to: Gale Garmon of K-ville, PA for assisting in determining engine colors.

A Tip from Carl Pearson: 292 Green can be obtained through Krylon, paint #2013, known as GM Alpine Green or Detroit Diesel Green.

More on GM engines

T-1918 – ’28 Light Truck has the same engine as the 4-cylinder car engine.

1941 – 235 CI engine was available in 1 1/2 ton and COE models.

Through the 1950′s – GMC also produced a 302CI 6-cylinder engine.

1957 – GMC produced a 347 CI Pontiac engine

The King

Monday, February 8th, 2010
The King ATHS Logo
Its the annual convention of the American Truck Historical Society. This year, 2010, it is in Pleasanton, California. Over 700 trucks of all sizes and makes gather at the Alameda County Fairgrounds.In a far grassy corner is a  sub group of local early GMC owners. Most seem to be acquainted and use this show as a reason to renew old friendships. There are few “trailer queen” trucks in this group, just dependable daily drivers. Most owners know how to repair the occasional problems that are a part of driving a 50 year old truck.

A crowd begins to gather late afternoon on the second day of the convention in this GMC truck cluster. The attention is not so much on the 1958 GMC stepside 1/2 ton with its Pontiac V-8 plus three factory two barrel Rochester carbs and correct large air filter. The interest is on the contents of the bed.

Here, only heard of by most GMC enthusiasts, is a real inline 302 cubic inch six cylinder engine from the late 1950′s! It has all the aftermarket high performance options of 50 years ago. It sits on a special frame with no body panels obstructing the view. All is there to touch and feel.

The owner is John Christ of San Francisco, CA. He has built this 302 just like it would be for racing in the late 1950′s. John located a new engine about 5 years ago and since has been hunting GMC speed parts so he could build it just like the race track engines of 50 years ago.

This is the first time the 302 has been seen by the general public and almost never had John tried to make it start. He had planned for this moment at the ATHS convention for a long time.

As the crowd grew and watched, the battery beside the engine was connected. The small nearby temporary gas tank was attached to the fuel line. The foot start linkage was pressed by hand and engine began to turn. It does not start and fuel drips from line connections. Yes, John has a good size fire extinguisher.

A water pump drip is not repairable at the show but John climbs into the truck bed with the engine to stop fuel drips at joints and makes several other adjustments. He tries again.

The engine belches flames from the human skulls covering the Stromberg 97′s. Still no action. More adjustments are needed.Now the engine fires a few times. With no exhaust pipes this may get loud!!. John has a friend push the starter linkage while he turns more screws and then off it goes. It is running on all six and the sound is probably heard through most of the convention. Its almost like it is saying, “Where’s the race track?” Applause was heard from many in the crowd when they are not covering their ears. The King
A few of the items John has collected over the years makes this 302 just right:- Venolia Pistons, These very light weight aluminum racing pistons raise the compression ratio to 9.5 to 1. John had them custom made for this engine. Yes, premium fuel is a requirement.

- Howard intake manifold. Allows the use of five Stromberg 97 carburetors. The progressive linkage uses number 2 and 4 carbs when driving normally. Carb. 1, 3, and 5 are waiting to operate when speed is necessary. Fuel economy, are you kidding!

- The engine was totally balanced to prevent any vibration at higher RPM.

- The bee-hive oil filter beside the block cools the oil as much as it cleans it.

- A 40 year old Wayne valve cover and side plate are almost impossible to find. They  have never been reproduced for the GMC engine.

- The special high volume aluminum oil pan is a necessity when racing on the track.- Fenton headers. These lessen back pressure. Exhaust gases leave the engine much quicker under acceleration.

- A highly modified camshaft is a must! Getting more fuel and air into the combustion chamber adds to the available horse power.

A stock 302 GMC six cylinder with this equipment is why so many small town dirt tracks had to ban vehicles using truck engines in the 1950′s.

The local hobbyist racing a car engine couldn’t win a race against a built up 302. They wouldn’t spend the money to register if a high performance GMC was allowed. To keep the dirt track’s popularity, a sign was often posted “No Truck Engines” but secretly it meant no 302s.

The King
The King
John Christs’ future plans for his 302 is placing it in a recently purchased 1940 GMC pickup. It may be an easy drop-in but this little truck will have a real awakening when its time for performance! John can be contacted on the club website at www.oldgmctrucks.com under the name Big bad swing daddy.
The King The King The King

1948 Chevrolet Suburban

Monday, February 1st, 2010

Owner: Unkown

1948 chevrolet suburban

Finding a forgotten 60 year old stored vehicle to restore is very unlikely in today’s world. They have been already found and junked or are in the hands of a new owner. The most unusual exception is our feature truck of the month.

This 1948 Chevrolet Suburban has been setting behind a storage building or machine shop so long it is buried to the axles in dirt and sand. No garage! The dry air of the area has slowed weathering, though a light surface rust film has developed. No dents and most original parts still remain. Note the GM grill guard, spot light, and optional rear signals.

What a find for a serious rebuilder. Most experienced restorers know the year or more to obtain the parts for this series of Suburban. Here, most all is in place even down to hubcaps and seats. Covered on one side with sage brush, photos on the one open side could be taken to show the detail.

As soon as we begin to say this is just too good to believe, we found it is. The owner states “It’s been in my family since new and I am going to fix it up someday”. Have we ever heard that comment?

The person that recently found this Suburban is also hoping to buy it sometime. Therefore, he traded me these pictures for the promise I would not mention any contacts including him. Sorry!

1948 chevrolet suburban 1948 chevrolet suburban 1948 chevrolet suburban

1948 chevrolet suburban 1948 chevrolet suburban

1967 Chevrolet C30

Friday, January 1st, 2010

Owner: Dan Kosteiny

1967 chevrolet

As luck would have it, I found this rare 1967 Chevrolet C30 pickup on eBay just 80 miles from home. I saw a reference to GM having built pickups with a nine foot stepside bed in an old dealer brochure. Surprised, I punched “9 foot box” into an eBay search, and this truck popped up. When I went to look at it, I knew I had to have it. I told the seller to pull it off eBay, as it was MINE!

I bought it from the second owner, Tim, who had inherited it from the original owner, an old family friend. Tim had first learned to drive in the truck before it was handed down. Originally purchased for Skagit Valley Sheet Metal, north of Seattle, WA, the truck was at some point fitted with a large cabover camper, so the bed wood and bedsides are nearly perfect.

I purchased the truck with just over 90,000 mikes on it. The truck is completely unrestored. It still wears the original paint, has the factory cloth and vinyl seat, and beige rubber floor mat, all intact. It came with the owner’s manual, the protecto-plate, factory build sheet, etc, all in the factory plastic envelope. It is equipped with a 283 cu. in. V-8, compound low 4 speed and 4:57 rear gearing. It is optioned with Heavy Duty auxiliary rear springs, HD battery, HD alternator, HD radiator and a front stabilizer, so it’s one tough truck.

What I find most unusual about this truck is the appearance upgrades it received. You would think that a 1 ton, nine foot stepside pickup would be purely a work vehicle, but this truck was ordered as a “Custom”, with the additional stainless trim, panoramic rear window, chrome hubcaps, and chrome front and rear bumpers. I believe this truck was a special factory order, and could perhaps be one of a kind. I’m amazed Chevy ever built this truck. It’s on it’s own 133″ wheelbase frame, and rides on 17″ split rims which are specific to the one ton pickup. According to the Chevrolet Pickup Red Book (Motorbooks International), Chevy built 526,776 light trucks in 1967, but only 4,026 were 1 ton stepsides – a fraction of one percent.

The only thing I’ve done to the truck is re-do the factory split rims, and remount the old 7.50 – 17 bias ply truck tires. Somehow, I found a full set of NOS chrome hubcaps on eBay. I plan to keep it as original as possible, for as long as possible. All it hauls now is dog! Jim Carter has not been able to sell me a single part yet, but he knows he’ll get me on my 14 other old trucks!

Dan Kostelny
Olympia WA
360-943-6333
ishnue@aol.com

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1946 Chevrolet

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Owner: Tommie Jones

1946 chevrolet

I am glad that you have shown an interest in my pickup. It was purchased from a local theater in 1964 they used it to carry a billboard in the back. After purchase it was used to carry feed and seed on the farm. After purchase of a newer pickup my Dad’s employee used it to carry fuel and supplies to a bull dozer until the engine was beginning to fail. At that time it was parked on blocks with wheels removed in about 1970. Had thought about working on it on and off occasionally, but never did. I retired from the Texas Department of Transportation in 2007 after 26 years. Did some fence building, built a hay barn and added a room on my shop which was useful when I started on the project.

On the first of November last year put two of the tires that had been originally on it when parked and brought it to the shop. Spent about a week taking it apart and checking the condition of the parts. Saw that all the brakes and drums would need replacing. Had read it was best to get the frame and body worked first so removed everything from the frame and started sand blasting. After sand blasting everything was treated with Ospho and primed and stored inside. The battery box was replaced and the front springs which were broken. After this was together and painted checked the engine out. It had frozen where it couldn’t be repaired so decided to go with a 235. Didn’t find one, but did find a useable 261 from an old truck. Carried the head to the machine shop to be worked. Ordered parts and did the other motor work myself. The head was the only thing that I didn’t do myself. Had worked on the farm and Highway Department so experience on mechanical work. Now started on the body, had to replace windows, door handles, fuel tank and floor board. Only rusted out places were where varmints had piled dirt between front fender and cab. This was my first major body work and painting so that was a learning experience. Fenders were rather rough so had to do quite a bit of work on them. Looked at bed kits, but was in Home Depot one day and saw some wood I liked so bought. Cut to fit and grooved for bed strips. Had joined a local car club the first of this year and they were having a car show the last of September. Was close, but was able take it to it. Wanted to use original Chevy colors so checked paint chips and found the Suburban colors I liked. Left the grille painted because it was originally and chrome was so expensive. The colors are top Airedale brown and bottom Cireassian brown and interior the hammered tan. Again want to thank you for your interest for it was a very interesting project. All parts were purchased from Jim Carter except a few on e-bay.

Tommie Jones
401 CR 115
Comanche, TX 76442
254-842-5863

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1938 Chevrolet

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Owner: Don Cotrona

1938 chevrolet

Now, this is just like they used to be!

A 1938 Chevy 1/2 ton rebuilt, beginning with the bare frame and made to look as it was on the dealer showroom over 70 years ago.

The owner and restorer is Don Cotrona of Wallinford, Connecticut. Almost no compromise was made to keep it like it was when driven off the assembly line in 1938. Don even uses the rare 1937-1938 16 inch wheels with the eight slots. Note the correct Brewster green paint, oval bumper bolts, and black front and rear window frames.

This little 1/2 ton was bought 37 years ago when Don was 16 years old. Even though well used it was ‘love at first sight’. He had personally saved $300.00 and thus could make the full purchase.

The disassembly and removal of six layers of paint began immediately. This was the inexpensive part! Putting it back together for regular use on a schoolboy’s budget made it a much more time involved project. It finally became his daily driver after straightening all fenders and cab plus using locally found paint and upholstery. This 1938 became Don’s to school driver. He even dated his future wife while it was his only transportation!

Then came college, marriage, a new home, children and more college. Don kept his little pickup in storage knowing someday it would come back to life. He collected parts for many years from collectors, swapmeets, and answering ads in car magazines. Even the new old stock grill was found in two halves over several years.

So now the rebuilding is complete about 36 years after its initial purchase. Don has made it as the Chevy dealer would have sold it in 1938. Note the snow tires. A necessity for a New England pickup when sold new in the winter. It came with the hand built trailer hitch formed to fit the rear bumper braces. The installation of the new mirror arms is due this month. The old 6-volt radio (see antenna) was required by a teenager that drove the truck in the early years. The little 216 six-cylinder engine and three-speed transmission couldn’t run better. One difference now is that it never sees rain. Water occurs only on washday!

Don Cotrona can be contacted by email: don@hammelny.com

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1952 Chevrolet

Thursday, October 1st, 2009

Owner: Jim Swing

1952 chevrolet

This is my original 1952 Chevy truck with only 83,783 miles on it. The truck was sold in Rush City, Minnesota at Schneider Chevrolet, which is no longer in business. It was kept in the area by Leroy Lindstrom. I bought it at a garage sale in 2007, just the way it sits, for $2500.00. I had to redo the box wood and put on a new muffler but every thing else is original. It still has the 6 volt system, six cylinder, and three on the tree.

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1967 Chevrolet

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Owner: Dennis and Bonnie Wegemer

1967 chevrolet

Hello to all! Here is our 1967 C10 with a 1993 step side bed. This is owner built with a 305 tune port 700R4 trans from a 1988 Trans Am. It has a tilt column, Dolphin gauges, billet gauge panel and glove box, classic under dash AC, hidden hitch, front and rear roll pans, Ansen wheels, and lots more.

This truck is Corvette Red and shares a garage with a 1956 Chevy truck, (which is Denny’s daily driver — he has put over 53,000 miles on it in the past four years), and a 1948 International Harvester panel truck, 1934 Chevy Sedan, Bonnie’s 1955 Chevy Belair Sport Coupe, and my new baby, 1977 Gremlin. Don’t hate!

Here is a link to other photos of the truck: http://public.fotki.com/sassychevy/1967chevyc10forsale/

We are in our late 50′s, and have been playing with cars since the 60′s. Denny has his tinmansgarage (his hobby shop-man cave), and Bonnie has her woodworking shop (her tree house). Denny is a machinist and fabricator by trade which makes it cost effective to play with old cars and trucks.

Denny and Bonnie Wegemer
sassychevy@charter.net

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1951 Chevrolet

Saturday, August 1st, 2009

Owner: Jim Streeby

1951 chevrolet

I was volunteering for my church, working the graveyard security shift, at a fireworks tent. The 11pm-7am shift was an opportunity to visit with a couple of men from our church, share a few stories etc. We got to talking and I told my new friend I had been searching a long time for a specific, Chevy, truck;.After several awkward moments of complete silence, he looked at me and said, I know where one is, but I don’t think he’ll sell it! 4 weeks later My new friend Aubrey had traveled 7 hours west, to the far southwest corner of Kansas. He called me on his sell phone, was driving the truck, and excitedly told me how wonderfully preserved it was;’If you don’t buy it Jim I will’ he said. That was good enough for me. He even delivered it!

I bought this 1951 Chevy ½ ton in the summer of 2007. I travel the state of Nebraska and Kansas for a living and had called on or looked at many trucks ;so I was picky. This truck arrived in September of 2007, I immediately put new tires and brakes on it, tuned it up and drove it to a few cruise nights. In October my friends encouraged me to enter it at the Midwest National Truck Show. It took 1st place in Original, Un-restored Class. I brought it home and the next day began to completely disassemble the truck.

Over the next 21 months I completely became obsessed with the total frame off restoration. With the constant help of many friends I did a complete frame off restoration. This truck was exactly like the one my grandfather taught me to drive when I was 12 years old. I touched, cleaned, replaced or repaired every nut, bolt, spring, cotter key;.you get the picture;anything less would have a disservice to the impact he had on my life.

I had all the metal including the frame bead blasted. The frame was powdered coated and all other metal was prepped, etching, primered, and a professional paint job was done by a good friend who doesn’t wish to be named. The motor ran fine, but I took it all the way down to the block, replaced the necessary parts, installed hardened valves and made it burn unleaded gas.

The pictures enclosed tell the rest of the story;My goal was to preserve history;.I love this truck and because of my strong desire to do artfully anal retentive job, I have many people to thank. Ken McCarty was with me every step. His vast teaching ability and help was invaluable. My friend Rod Adams artfully crafted the bed wood, Jack Crawford and I installed the 3.55 ring and pinion gears. And last but not least, Mike Taylor and the rest of the staff at Jim Carters were invaluable sources of information and support. Thanks to all! Jim Streeby

1951 chevrolet 1951 chevrolet 1951 chevrolet

1951 chevrolet

1947 Chevrolet Suburban Woody

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Owner: Don Bryant

1947 chevrolet

During the 1940′s and 1950′s a few body companies created their own design of truck not offered by the chassis manufacturer. In this case the Campbell Co. made their own “station wagon” body to fill a need of a small number of buyers. its all wood construction and 3 or 4 side doors made a very attractive package. It was similar to the GM all metal Suburban with 2 doors.

It this example the Campbell body was built for a Chevrolet or GMC truck. GM would provide the 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton chassis with factory front sheet metal and windshield plus rear fenders to their dealer. Campbell offered a completed wood body as an exact fit. It could be shipped to a specialized body instillation company and then the local Chevrolet and GMC dealer would have it installed.

Campbell’s body was a replacement for the GM all metal Suburban body. It offered more accessibility and better seating for passengers. Thus, the extra cost was not a factor to many buyers. The Campbell fitted GM truck was perfect to transport people to and from airports and train stations, for school bus routes, hotels, country clubs, tours, camps, etc.

Below is a 1951 ad from the Mid State Body Co. in Waterloo, NY. Shown are the three different Campbell bodies that was available at that time.

This month’s feature is one of these rare Campbell/GM trucks. Few (even rare when new) have survived. This classic like new restored example is on a 1947 1/2 ton Chevrolet chassis and owned by Don Bryant of Oakland, California.

Don bought his 1947 Chevrolet cab and chassis totally restored in 1997. It even included the correct Chevrolet color, Windsor Blue. However, the Campbell body was not rebuilt. He states the “wood was in a large, gnarly pile”. A hunt began for a specialist in older body restoration. Recommendations led him to Ron Heiden in Encinita, CA. His good reputation resulted in Don waiting a year before his turn arrived.

It was in Ron’s shop for 10 months for this procedure! The next step was for even more fine detailed work at the Moonlight Woodies Restoration Shop in Cambrea, CA. The finished product is now for “show-and-go”. Its a work of art that is part of history. Don now drives the Campbell wagon on rare occasions up to about 75 miles from home. Of course, no rain allowed!.

His eamil address is: dbryant@barnesconti.com

1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody

1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody

1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody

1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody

1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody 1947 chevrolet suburban woody

1957 Chevrolet Panel

Monday, June 1st, 2009

Owner: Ralph Wescott

1957 chevrolet panel

Regular readers of this section know we tend to give credit to trucks that are the more unusual. This month is no exception.

Our truck of the month is a 1957 GMC 1/2 ton NAPCO Panel. No doubt this type truck was rarely seen even in 1957. When you consider the factory options, it may have been almost one of a kind 52 years ago!

Why was this panel truck ordered with so many extras? The owner either had very special needs or the GMC dealer wanted the best for display in their showroom. Money must not have been a consideration.

This 1957 Panel truck has its third owner – Ralph Wescott of Largo, Florida. Its working days (may have never existed) are now over. It is kept in Ralph’s temperature controlled garage with several other classics.

In viewing this vehicle you will see the same options that are on the dealer invoice including a 347 Pontiac V-8, 4 speed Hydramatic transmission, power steering, electric windshield wipers, radio, turn signals, passenger seat, white wall tires, fresh-air heater, chrome grill and bumpers, clock, chrome dash knobs, two-tone paint, higher speed 3.07 differential, etc.

The Denver, Colorado GMC dealership then had a local NAPCO dealer add the 4X4 system. Thus, the total package with freight and handling was over $4,000. Quite a heavy price when you consider a base 1/2 ton was less than $1,500. You couldn’t carry $5.00 in groceries in 1957!

This panel truck was restored ground-up by the second owner, in Michigan, 15 years ago. He then placed it in storage as he did not like the feeling of the hard transmission shift. When Ralph bought it last year, the shifting problem was on the top of his list. It was carefully adjusted step by step with much detail. The Hydramatic now operates like new.

Note the 2 tone on the 1955-58 GM panel trucks consist of the white section by the door windows. This was to give local sign painters more success on adding a customer’s logo.

The attached photos show what a special panel Ralph has purchased. The original colors and loaded with options!

1957 chevrolet panel truck 1957 chevrolet panel truck 1957 chevrolet panel truck

1957 chevrolet panel truck 1957 chevrolet panel truck 1957 chevrolet panel truck

Note: The new battery caps. Ralph found the 1950′s screw style so he redesigned the battery to fit them.

1957 chevrolet panel truck 1957 chevrolet panel truck

1946 GMC

Friday, May 1st, 2009

Owner: Charlie

1946 gmc truck

Charlie has owned this truck for over 30 years, since he was 12 years old. He bought it with paper route money. His parents said “What are you gonna do with that truck” he said “gonna drive it”. And he did just that after scraping out the oil pan and replacing the fuel tank.

Message from Charlie:

This truck drives like a dream, goes down the road straight, I sure am glad I took the time to redo the king pins spring bushings and bearings also it likes to roll with the tires I got they look like narrow original but are radials. At first I had a little trouble using the lousy gas of today it cleaned all the varnish off the floats that looked good which made them sink. Not a big deal quick trip to Napa and $14 dollars later ol red purrs smooth.

1939 Chevrolet Model XHJC

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

Owner: Brian Robinson

1939 chevrolet model xhjc

Now that our 1939 has had it’s restoration completed we thought we would send you some photos of the finished product.
You will notice that the 1939 New Zealand trucks were noticeably different in the cab area than the American trucks (other than the steering wheel being on the right side!) which could be of interest to others.

Thanks for all your assistance with parts.
Bryan Robinson, Tirau, New Zealand

1939 chevrolet model xhjc 1939 chevrolet model xhjc 1939 chevrolet model xhjc

1951 GMC

Sunday, February 1st, 2009

Owner: Tom Pryor

1951 gmc

This 1951 GMC advance design half ton is owned by Tom Pryor of Kansas City, Missouri. Found four years ago in Clinton Missouri it was originally an Iowa farm truck. The previous owners had started a very poor attempt at restoration, sanding the old paint with little body repair then applying primer, the truck then sat in the outside elements were surface rust took over on every panel of the truck. The wood bed was rotten, electrical non-existent and field mice had taken over the interior.

My friend and project mentor Rod Adams was the driving force behind the restoration, he has given up many Sundays over four years to help me get the truck in the shape as you see in the photo. Rod owns a 1951 Chevrolet advance design himself and is very familiar with repairing these collectible trucks and has owned many over the years. Most body panels were removed and sandblasted to remove rust and coats of old paint and primer, then we hand sanded the entire truck to prepare the body for Rust Bullet primer. Originally the truck was black, but I decided the Forester Green was a better choice bringing Ol Jimmy back to life. No doubt, Rod will not take on another novice, I think I have been a challenge for him but have learned the dos and don’ts of restoration.

The interior has been restored to original factory specs as well and looks wonderful. All in all it has been an incredible experience and I can’t wait to get to take it out on a long ride when nice weather returns in the spring. For right now it will find home covered in Rod’s airplane hanger on his farm.

Rod and I want to make wooden side rails for the bed. I’m still not sure what color they will be, wood stained or painted and distressed like the new bed. Rod is a true craftsman when it comes to woodworking, especially reproduction furniture ; but I digress … back to the truck. With his wood working skills Rod milled and constructed a new yellow pine bed which we painted black then distressed to make the bed look worn and camouflage future scuffs, then sealed with a wood protector. I’m also considering adding an exterior windshield sun visor but for now I’m content with her profile. The running boards also posed some concern/choices, either prepare and paint like factory or cover them with a protective bed liner non-skid coating on all sides. The coating won out and I’m so glad I don’t have to worry about nicks and scrapes, plus the underside is now protected from the road elements.

The other thing that needs completion is the installation of seat belts; they have been purchased but not installed so that will be an upcoming project. I just don’t feel safe driving any vehicle unless I’m strapped in — even if it’s just lap belts.

Old and new parts were purchased from Jim Carter’s; the sales staff Lisa, Jimmy and Julie were always helpful in finding me everything needed to complete the restoration. In the end the truck turned out more than I expected. Originally looking for a knock-a-round weekend driver, the GMC has surpassed my wildest dreams. I’m most grateful for Rod’s time and talent that has brought this project to completion.

1951 gmc 1951 gmc

1948 Chevrolet 3100

Thursday, January 1st, 2009

Owner: Scott Scheibner

1948 chevrolet 3100

Years ago when I lived in Washington State, I had a 1950 Chevrolet 3100 that I restored/rebuilt customized from the frame up. It was my hunting and fishing truck and I loved it. During a time when I was getting ready to build an addition to my house here in California, I got talked into selling my 50. Never felt such pain as I did watching it drive away. My wife hugged me and told me that someday I could get another one. That day finally arrived about 10 years later when I saw my 1948 Chevy 3100 online for sale. It was someone’s project and had a few things done to it that were what I had planned on doing to a truck. I bought the truck and began the long process of re-doing many of the things that were done half assed. It has turned out to be a very special truck even though I’m still working on it.

As with all of my vehicles that I have had and those that I still do, I seem to continually turn to Jim Carter for those parts that aren’t always the easiest to find. I also check with Jim Carter and compare prices because most often his prices are better and he doesn’t gouge you on shipping/handling. I want to thank Jim Carter Classic Truck Parts for always being there with advise, parts and great customer service.

1948 chevrolet 3100 1948 chevrolet 3100 1948 chevrolet 3100

1948 chevrolet 3100 1948 chevrolet 3100 1948 chevrolet 3100

1948 chevrolet 3100 1948 chevrolet 3100

1937 Trailabout

Monday, December 1st, 2008

Owner: Ron Loos

1937 trailabout

It’s 1937 and the Great Depression has affected all households. Sales of new cars and trucks have dropped and most manufacturers have permanently shut their doors. The struggling survivors must add ways to stay above the level of bankruptcy.

One of General Motors ideas was to increase sales by adding a new product that their GMC dealers could market. This was the Trailabout, an all purpose small trailer that could be used by both car and truck owners. GMC produced it with little added expense. Most items were already used on their 1/2 ton pickup. The bed, taillights, fenders, wheels, and hubcaps were in stock. The additional GM investment was the light weight metal frame with tongue.

Sales were low during it’s two year production. It is suspected that the $350.00 price discouraged most buyers. During the Depression people could make a trailer from a salvage yard pickup truck or just build one from used materials. The savings would be great over the Trailabout.

Today, finding a real Trailabout is next to impossible. They were bought for hauling and most were never garaged. Their wood floors were probably gone in less than 10 years.

The only Trailabout known to exist belongs to Ron Loos (ronloos@charter.net). Its life began in 1937 in Atlanta, Georgia. It was towed to a new home in Independence, Missouri in 1987, then was hauled to Ron’s home in California mid 2008. Ron is giving it a ground up restoration and will be pulling it to shows with his almost one of a kind 1938 GMC Canopy Express. Won’t that be the talk of any show!

1937 trailabout 1937 trailabout 1937 trailabout

1937 trailabout 1937 trailabout

1972 Chevrolet 3/4 ton

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Owner: Edward Eckel

1972 chevrolet

My truck began life as a 1972 3/4 ton Custom chassis cab with a 350, heavy-duty camper suspension and four on the floor. I purchased it new in November 1971, and by February 1972, I installed a camper body on it. It remained this way until 1995 when the camper body was no longer reliable, having developed some fatal leaks causing some structural weaknesses. It was no longer practical or economical to keep it as a camper. I was faced with the dilemma of what to do with it. I decided to put a bed on it and spruce it up a bit, keeping if for cruise night fun. It had already served us for over 120,000 miles as a camper and was deserving of a comfortable retirement. It has never spent one day in a garage and still stays outdoors but now under a very good car cover. The original plan was only for a paint job and to install a pickup bed.

As it always seem to happen, you can’t simply ‘spruce it up.’ Once you start, you need to go all the way and fix everything. It ran perfectly so I just added some polished trim to the engine, put in a cam, roller rockers, headers, MSD ignition and added an Edelbrock four-barrel carb. on a new Edelbrock manifold.

After locating all the parts to build a nice rust free bed since in New Jersey most are rusted away, things came together nicely. Since it was an 8 foot bed, new bed sides were unavailable so those came from Southern California. Last year with the help of a few good friends, the bed went on then this spring the last of the front end parts and the engine compartment were finished. I kept the original Hawaiian blue color but made it a more sporty two tone, adding the white cab top and in between the side moldings then added all the necessary trim to complete the look. The interior is partly original, part new. The dash was stripped and refinished but the rest of the interior paint is original. The seat, visors and door panels are original but the dash pad, carpeting and steering wheel are replaced. The old 16.5′ wheels were replaced with 16′ aluminum ones and the bed sports an oak natural wood floor with all the mounting hardware of polished stainless steel.

There are many more little things left to be done as time allows to make it even better but for now it looks good and drives well. The first trip to our local cruise night after it was finished I was awarded a trophy so I’m glad my hard work is appreciated by others more talented than myself.

Edward Eckel

1972 chevrolet 1972 chevrolet 1972 chevrolet

1948 Chevrolet

Wednesday, October 1st, 2008

Owner: Roger Darrow

1948 chevrolet

* 1948 Chevrolet
* 6 volt system, all original, floor starter
* 1972 blazer wheels (so I could run radial tires)
* Factory 4 speed

1940 Chevrolet

Monday, September 1st, 2008

Owner: John Buhr

1940 chevrolet

This truck has been in my family for nearly fifty years. my dad purchased it from a local GMC dealer in our hometown in western Wisconsin and we are the third owners. The truck was purchased new by the Wisconsin Dept. of Agriculture, next by a farmer in a neighboring community, and then by my dad. We used it on our small farm, hauling can milk to the local creamery, trips to the feed mill, and in the fields at planting and harvest time. It worked well as an all around work truck. We quit farming in the mid sixties and my dad turned the truck over to me. I then used it as a daily driver for about 10 years. During that time I pounded out a few dents that came from the everyday work on the farm, sprayed some paint on it and always kept it out of the weather when not in use.

In about 1975 I started taking it apart, overhauling the engine and replacing the clutch and brakes. It was stored, torn apart, for about 25 years. In 2001 I decided to get going on it again, first doing the front fenders, box, and rear fenders. I did the mechanical work myself and with the help of my cousin, who has a body shop, we finally finished it in 2007.

Over the years I picked up some replacement parts from Jim Carter Classic Truck Parts, and also found some parts at swap meets. The body was pretty much rust free, the running boards were rusted quite badly, but I was able to find a pair in western state that were in very good condition. The rear fenders were a challenge. I had the grille and bumpers re-chromed. Did the bed floor in red oak.

John Buhr

1940 chevrolet 1940 chevrolet 1940 chevrolet

1940 chevrolet 1940 chevrolet

1949 Chevrolet

Friday, August 1st, 2008

Owner: Steve Jones

1949 chevrolet truck

In the search for unusual trucks to place in our monthly feature, we came to a stop when we found this 1949 Chevrolet ½ ton. Though not restored original, it looks on the outside much like what would have been seen on the road in the early 1950′s.

The owner and restorer is Steve Jones of Manawatu, New Zealand. Steve says this over two year project finished even better than planned. The following is a basic summary of what became a very large project. For further details, contact Steve at: Chevytrucks49@e3.net.nz

Locating this type truck to rebuild was difficult on the islands of New Zealand. The country is ‘down under’ (below the equator) and finding this GM body style became Steve’s challenge. He began to feel lucky if he could just find one for sale.

Finally, Steve found a 1949 Chevy ½ ton with no motor or transmission and an excess of cab rust. With little negotiations, the truck was bought. Steve knew it would be just what he had in his plans once the rebuilding was completed.

The long frame rails were not altered in this rebuilding and all the sheet metal is like it left the assembly plant in Petone, New Zealand in 1949. Yet, the hidden changes are many! The engine is a GM 350 V-8 and the automatic transmission is an overdrive turbo 700R4 from a 1993 Holden (GM in Australia). Also, from that car is a 3.08 ratio differential with disc brakes. The total package gives good vehicle speed at lower engine RPM.

The front rack and pinion assembly comes from a later model XJ6 Jaguar sedan. Steve was quite surprised to find the complete assembly fit the 1949 with very little alteration. It provides disc brakes with four pistons on each front rotor. A vacuum booster for the power brakes is bolted to the left frame rail. The original steering wheel with upper column remains 1949.

Steve used two u-joints and special brackets where he cut his original column just below the floor. In this way the lower Jaguar column can be connected under the hood and out of view. Even the accelerator pedal is pure 1949. He made skillful cuts, bends, and welds to keep the early accelerator pedal assembly which moves the four barrel carburetor linkage of the GM V-8. Remember, this little New Zealand ½ ton has always been right hand drive! The accelerator linkage must run horizontally from beside the right inner fender along the outside of the firewall through brackets to reach the left side of the carburetor throttle rod. Quite a design even for General Motors!

After these difficult mechanical changes, Steve began with the sheet metal. He knew it would be difficult to locate replacement metal in New Zealand. The excess rust would require all fenders, replacing the rusted front cowl panels, and adding a new bed. These items would have to be imported from the United States.

Many items on this New Zealand right hand drive 1949 are unusual to owners of US made Chevrolet early trucks. The most interesting area is the dash. See photo. Not only are the gauge position reversed but look at the top. There is no openings for a radio! Even the speaker grill is without slots for the radio sound. (It is actually a glove box door cut shorter. ) The holes for the ignition switch and cigarette lighter are the same, however the use is reversed.

When you think your GM truck restoration project is requiring more work than you expected, think of Steve Jones in New Zealand. His ’49 is now near show quality and probably one of a kind in this smaller country. Steve’s comment: Never give up!

1949 chevrolet truck 1949 chevrolet truck 1949 chevrolet truck

1949 chevrolet truck 1949 chevrolet truck 1949 chevrolet truck

Far Right: Similar Truck Owned by Graham Stewert, Wyndham, New Zealand

1953 GMC

Tuesday, July 1st, 2008

Owner: Jerry Willis

1953 gmc

This 1953 GMC 1/2 ton is certainly one of the more special trucks we see at today’s shows. It not only is of interest to people now but would have been a definite attention getter in the 1950′s. Jerry Willis of Independence, MO bought this farm truck un-restored in 1995 and is the third owner. He found it in South Missouri so it had not experienced winter road salt. It was a great candidate for restoration.

Jerry personally restored the truck including the body work, final paint, and refinishing of the bed wood. Its many little extras were added to make it look like a more custom truck you would have seen 50 years ago. Therefore, the transmission, brakes, and rear end are just like they left the factory. Even the “bullet-proof” closed drive shaft system that operated so well during its working years is still in place.

The mint green custom color of the 1950′s, louvered hood, Fulton sun visor, carpeting, cloth interior, and deluxe 1950 car steering wheel were also added by Jerry. The new 18″ chrome wheels and radial tires are one of the few items that is more modern.

Soon after the GMC was purchased, a connecting rod of the original 228 engine came loose from the crankshaft and cracked the block! During his hunt for a replacement engine, Jerry discovered that the larger 270 GMC engine of the late 1950′s was an exact fit in his 1/2 ton. The rebuilding cost was about the same but the horse power would be greatly increased. For better engine breathing, a pair of Fenton exhaust headers were also added.

The total package is about what your would have seen in custom auto magazines and in auto shows during the 1950′s and 1960′s. The greater power is also like performance GMC’s were built with 50 years ago.

You can contact Jerry Willis at email: jjwilli5@aol.com

1953 gmc truck 1953 gmc truck 1953 gmc truck

1957 Chevrolet Cameo

Sunday, June 1st, 2008

Owner: Ken McCarty

1957 chevrolet cameo

This months feature truck is one of the better examples of a correct 1957 Chevrolet Cameo. Its a limited production 1/2 ton that was sold four years in the 1950′s. They are now rarely seen. GM added many extras to their 1/2 ton pickup and came up with this very deluxe truck. This “Boulevard Truck” drew customers into dealer showrooms and yet could be used by a new owner for light hauling.

This Cameo is owned and restored by Ken McCarty of Lake Lotawana, Missouri. It was discovered about nine years ago through a friend of a friend that knew what was under a car cover in a distant neighborhood. It had been beside a house 30 years in storage and was not easily seen by people passing by. Ken must have talked to the owner just right to make the purchase. It was almost as if it was meant that Ken was to own this Cameo.

The vehicle was restored piece by piece during five years. The longer restoration time was because Ken developed an illness during that period and his medical recovery took much time. He is sure this Cameo restoration is responsible for him being alive today. Planning on the next steps of rebuilding kept his mind occupied while he waited to regain his strength.

This Cameo is just about the way it came from the factory. Ken removed a later V-8 and added a more original early 283 cubic inch engine. Its optional overdrive column shift transmission saves engine RPM’s and gasoline plus allows more highway speed. Even a generator keeps the battery charged! The frame and ID plate numbers match.

The original painted valve covers and oil bath air cleaner are in storage when he wants to add an original touch. The Cardinal Red and Bombay Ivory exterior paint is just as it would have come from the factory. Note the optional white wall tires. The width of the white is pure 1957 vintage.

Ken’s Cameo is now a new truck! It is seen regularly at local car shows and always stops traffic. You can contact Ken McCarty at 1-816-578-4032.

1957 chevrolet cameo 1957 chevrolet cameo 1957 chevrolet cameo

1957 chevrolet cameo 1957 chevrolet cameo

1954 Chevrolet

Saturday, March 1st, 2008

Owner: Angus McDougald & Linda Challand

1954 chevrolet truck

Our 54 Chevy truck was won in a raffle in July, 1997. We were en-route to Cherokee, N.C. and saw a sign for a car show in Maggie Valley. So we went to the car show. Linda saw this truck and bought two tickets. They had one more show to attend and would announce the winner in August. Sure enough, in August they called and said Linda had won the truck.

The truck is a 1954, 3100, 5 window, 1/2ton pickup. It has the 235cid engine with three speed column shift. The only added option was factory turn signals. The body is really good and straight and the engine runs strong. The clutch and transmission will get some attention some day.

The truck had a really bad rear seal leak and I could find no one interesting in replacing the old felt seal. So we put it up for almost six years.

One day I happened on your website. Since I am a shade tree mechanic and you have the parts lets put the truck in at least a useable condition. It is just too nice not to be on the road. So that is where I am repairing one thing at a time. Immediate attention will be given to the steering box and tie rods. I now drive it almost daily and enjoy every minute.

Thanks,

Angus McDougald/Linda Challand

Addendum:
Our truck was being restored by a young man in the Morganton, N.C. area. He was a student at Haywood College in Waynesville, N. C. and a volunteer fireman. In the early 1990,s he and a group from Western N. C. went our West to assist in major fires they were having. During a major back fire, he and several others were killed. His Father made the decision to raffle the truck and have the proceeds fund a scholarship in the young man,s name at Haywood College. The young man had done a wonderful job on the truck. Linda is extremely proud to be the owner that does appreciates the truck.

Thanks Angus

1954 chevrolet truck 1954 chevrolet truck 1954 chevrolet truck

1954 chevrolet truck

1941 Chevrolet

Friday, February 1st, 2008

Owner: Jeff Lewis

1941 chevrolet truck

When I purchased the truck 3 years ago the engine had been rebuilt ( a 1960 235 inline 6) and installed and a feeble attempt had been made on the body work. The interior had to be completely de-rusted. The bed sides that came with the truck were not usable in my estimation so I purchased new bedsides, bed front and tailgate from Jim Carter.

The bed wood came from Jim Carter and is yellow pine stained with lampblack and linseed oil as the originals were. I did use stainless bed strips which are not original to the truck. I painted the truck myself and quickly found out that there is a steep learning curve on the painting but I stuck it out and it came out pretty good. I bought a used HVLP system but if the truth be known, other than the cab and the bedsides everything else was painted using the disposable PreVal sprayers!! They work great.

I worked three winters on the truck. I had to replace the brakes and lines and opted for the stainless steel brake lines. I purchased a few items on eBay but the majority from Jim Carter. I was fortunate in that I live about an hour from Jim Carter and was able to make several trips there and develop a relationship with Mike Taylor. Mike would let me roam around in the basement where all the used parts are, and there were times when I would spend practically the whole day there. Mike went out of his way to help me find difficult to find parts that are not available reproduction. Most people don’t realize the Jim Carter has much more than what is shown in his catalog. They have a huge basement and several yards filled with cabs and used parts. People should check with him first before bidding on eBay for used parts!

1941 chevrolet truck 1941 chevrolet truck 1941 chevrolet truck

1941 chevrolet truck 1941 chevrolet truck 1941 chevrolet truck

1955 Chevrolet Advance Design

Tuesday, January 1st, 2008

Owner: Marty Bozek

1955 chevrolet truck

This month we feature one of the most unique eye catching Advance Design 1/2 tons in the country. On daily runs it is a real traffic stopper. At car shows it is surrounded by curious admirers and trophies seem to be a regular occurrence.

This little 1955 1st series ½ ton is the creation of Marty and Jean Bozek near Tampa, Florida. It was bought from the second owner in 1983 after starting its life in 1955 near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The potential of this truck in primer with no prior restoration became a challenge. Almost all restoration and upgrades were done by Marty in the evening at his home near New York City. His goal was to keep it original in appearance yet add modern updates that would look different only to the expert. The result is a 1/2 ton that turns heads and puts out the performance of a V8!

Marty has given his truck a 261 six cylinder (big brother to the famous 235) a 4 barrel carburetor, Howard cam, Fenton cast iron headers, electronic ignition, aluminum radiator, and ‘old time’ Smitty glass pack mufflers.

The transmission is the very popular 5 speed overdrive once found in Camaros and Firebirds in the 1980′s. It’s overdrive 5th gear performs just right on the open highway but gives the low speed power Marty wants for in town performance.

Even the differential has 3.55 gearing. This was by adding a complete 1973 Chevrolet Blazer rear end assembly. The rear tires fit the wheel wells just right. No rubbing the fenders on rough roads.

Now retired in Florida, Marty keeps improving his creation. He often thinks about modifications and has added a few additional items to his little ½ ton. He does it in his own way so that it is just right for this type of truck. A few recent additions were adding the 5 speed overdrive transmission and cold air conditioning. (No it doesn’t run hot in Florida summers.) Even the doors, firewall, top, floors, and rear cab wall have been sealed with hidden insulation!

This Chevy 1/2 ton may not out run a telegram but the race is close. Marty says ‘It idles like a sewing machine and goes like hell. Why would I even consider a V8?’ It is ‘the’ eye catcher at any auto show. Trophies have been many but some stand out more than others.

In Tampa, FL a large monthly cruise night gives a best of show honor at the end of the year. All the monthly winners compete for ‘Best of the Best.’ Yes, this little yellow pickup received the top award. They don’t get better than this!

Marty painted this truck in 1994. Several years ago it received the ‘Best Paint’ award in a show with hundreds of participants in Northern Florida. How’s that for non trailered vehicle that was painted about 10 years ago?

In 1999, at the Carlisle, Pennsylvania ‘All Truck Nationals,’ this truck received a second place trophy in the older truck class.

If you wish to talk to Marty Bozek about his special truck, the email address is: eng261@aol.com. (You must identify yourself as a truck person so you don’t get mixed and discarded with the junk mail.)

1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck

1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck 1955 chevrolet truck

1970 GMC Sierra

Saturday, December 1st, 2007

Owner: Roger Darrow

1970 gmc sierra

This old girl is on her 3rd SB305 engine, hauled a ton of sand last week on the leaf springs. It has found a second life hauling the boy scout trailer around. She is equipped with leaf springs, power steering, power brakes, tilt steering wheel, Eldebrock 550 cfm electric choke carburetor, five bolt wheels, and a factory tachometer.

1970 gmc sierra

1971 Chevrolet 1/2 ton Cheyenne

Thursday, November 1st, 2007

Owner: Martin Hall

1971 chevrolet truck

I purchased my 1971 Chevrolet 1/2 ton Cheyenne in the spring of 2002. My intentions were to do a patch up backyard restoration. I soon discovered that not only was it going to be a full restoration but a frame off restoration due to a lot more unforeseen rust and body damage.

My son and I did a complete engine swap starting with a bare 350 block and worked our way into building a super modified 383.

  • 350 bored .30 over
  • Hipo cast heads
  • Elderbrock aluminum intake and carb
  • Comp cam
  • Roller rockers
  • J.E. pistons and rods
  • Pete Jackson gear drive ‘soon to be blown’
  • Many other modifications as time went on

Months later I purchased a refurbished bed and began the long hard process of body work. During this time a good family friend who was well educated in bodywork helped guide us along while lending a hand to end a 2-1/2 year part time process. We shaved the trim molding along with the marker lights, added a billet grill, custom louvered tail gate with custom lighting, complete 6′ lowering kit, American Racing Outlaw 15 x 8 and 15 x 10 wheels. The paint scheme is ‘Alderson ‘ black with metal flake; Metallic Blue Ice trimmed with Ultra violet purple pin striping.

I showed the truck with incomplete interior at the 2006 All Truck Nationals in Riverside, Missouri hosted by Genuine Chevy GMC Truck Club of Kansas City. In the spring of 2007 the interior was completed with black and silver flamed interior and custom audio.

After much blood, sweat and tears shed through the entire process I’m proud to say she is not a trailer queen but not a daily driver.

Special thanks goes to Jim Carter, Mike, Sheba, Julie, Lynn, Wayne Alderson, R & S Upholstery, and my family for allowing me to spend the time and MONEY on my project.

1971 chevrolet truck 1971 chevrolet truck 1971 chevrolet truck

1961 Chevrolet Deluxe

Monday, October 1st, 2007

Owner: Greg Scott

1961 chevrolet deluxe truck

Have you ever seen one of these? Few were produced, almost none have survived.

This 1961 Chevrolet V-8 1/2 ton is one of a small percentage that came equipped with the deluxe trim package. Though most pickups at that time were standard work trucks, GM realized there was a small growing number of buyers that had a desire for a little extra on their truck.

This deluxe package not only included the unique stainless steel side trim (only available in 1960-1961) but also a stainless windshield molding, chrome bumpers and hub caps, plus rear cab trim panels behind the door window. Chrome dash knobs, right and left inside sunvisors, and a deluxe steering wheel added to the package.

Our feature 1/2 ton is owned and was mostly restored by Greg Scott of Independence, Missouri. The reason it was ordered new with such deluxe features was the needs of its original owner. A combination funeral home and cemetery operation in California used it for 30 years. They wanted the best appearance in the truck they used. The original paint was light blue and white. Greg kept the two tone paint division lines just like the original, but changed the truck color to red and white.

He purchased the truck two years ago from the second owner in central Missouri. This person had thrown away all the trim, but at least the attaching body holes remained. The long search for this trim leaves only one piece now missing. The horizontal right door strip has still not been located. Can anyone help? Yes, he knows the correct 1961 hub caps are needed. They are still on his want list. Greg says he has personally spent over 80 hours repairing the used stainless trim he found from various sources. While watching television in the evening he slowly removed dents, did surface sanding and polishing. The results are great! The photos show he placed this trim in just the right position.

The bed was removed and only the bare cab remained on the frame. All was sand blasted and then the slow assembly began. Fortunately, its 30 years in California had prevented body rust. It was like putting together a large model kit that lacked some of it’s parts.

Owner: Greg Scott 1-816-836-0960

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet 1938 chevrolet

1937 GMC T-14

Saturday, September 1st, 2007

Owner: Richard Carroll

1937 gmc pick up truck

Not only is this 1937 GMC T-14 very unusual but it is one of the only remaining examples of a pure original in existence. It is a part of history and will remain un-restored.

Owner Richard Carroll, of Greenfield, Massachusetts saw this little ½ ton 40 years ago with a for sale sign in the window. It had been used on a farm in Swansea, Massachusetts, by the original owner and showed 15,000 miles. In the glove box were the Certificate of War Necessity Papers. This allowed 30 gallons of gasoline per quarter and for farm use only during the World War II shortages. Even in 1967 it was quite unusual and Richard just had to own it.

He now drives it for pleasure only during nice weather and has added 26,000 miles during the last 40 years. Several years ago, the Danbury Mint (producer of authentic models) heard about this rare pickup. They spent much time measuring and photographing this vehicle. In 2005 they introduced an authentic model of this 1937. It can now be purchased from their catalog of special vehicles.

1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck

1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck

1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck 1937 gmc pick up truck

1936 Chevrolet

Wednesday, August 1st, 2007

Owner: Leo Stokesberry

1936 chevrolet pick up truck

A one of a kind truck! Yet, it is displayed regularly and is a part of local parades and drives.

This unusual 1936 Chevrolet 1 1/2 ton has been owned by Leo Stokesberry of Filer, Idaho for 28 years. With it’s original 34,000 miles it has required only fresh paint, tires, and a general detailing. It even still has it’s original 207 cubic inch six cylinder.

Because Leo lives in Idaho sugar beet country, he decided to add an original used side dump bed that was so popular may years ago. Yes, he certainly made this 1936 a part of history. These sugar beet trucks aren’t raised by a hoist on the front, the beds only are tipped to the side to easily remove the contents. The delivery terminals had a special lift that raised the side of the bed to unload the beets. See Photos!

Note the very rare accessory white turn signal arm on the left side of the cab. This is operated mechanically by the driver to tell a following vehicle that a left turn is coming. It is extended horizontally before the turn!

Leo trailers this 1936 to many distant shows and then it is driven throughout these local areas. He is a member of the American Truck Historical Society and has attended all of their annual conventions with his special truck since 1995. These shows have taken him from Baltimore, MD to California and many cities in between. This 1936 just keeps running with little maintenance.

Many of the enclosed pictures are from the 2007 ATHS convention in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Leo’s 1936 is shown during a sponsored day trip to the top of Pike’s Peak – elevation 14,110 feet. It climbed the hard surface and gravel road with little problems. Note the remaining June snow drifts in the background.

Obviously Leo Stokesberry loves using his truck. He maintains it properly and enjoys using it on local roads through the U.S.A.

1936 chevrolet pick up truck 1936 chevrolet pick up truck 1936 chevrolet pick up truck

1936 chevrolet pick up truck 1936 chevrolet pick up truck 1936 chevrolet pick up truck

1936 chevrolet pick up truck 1936 chevrolet pick up truck

1959 Chevrolet Deluxe

Sunday, July 1st, 2007

Owner: Don Lowrey

1959 chevrolet pick up truck

1959 Chevrolet Deluxe 1/2 Ton

This cab and early fleetside bed combination was available only during 1958 and 1959 but to get the bedside trim you had to wait with the last year. This was a time when trucks were usually bought for work and styling was far down the priority list. Therefore, one can appreciate the rarity of this month’s feature truck.

This 1959 Chevrolet deluxe ½ ton is owned by Don Lowrey of Lindsay, Ontario. He purchased it over 25 years ago during a visit to the U.S. Though at the time he did not realize its rarity, he knew the various deluxe features and color combination (Tartan Turquoise and Bombay Ivory) made for a very attractive package.

Shortly after the purchase of this, then 20 year old truck, Don decided to bring back the original shine by giving it new paint and re-chroming the bright metal. He was careful not to alter the original color or add extras that were not Chevrolet approved accessories.

The upholstery was kept without any replacing. Thus, we have a perfect example of the fabric Chevrolet used in their most deluxe pickup. Unlike the standard model, matching seat cloth was also placed over the door panels.

Note the untouched wood bed bottom. It still has much of its original black paint on yellow pine. NO, the manufacturers did not sand and varnish the bed floors!

Along with the many features that are standard with the deluxe package, this little ½ ton also has a few dealer installed accessories. The bumper guards, radio, heater, sunvisor, and wheel rings could have been added by the Chevrolet dealer.

Don has a certificate from the State of Pennsylvania that the 12,000 miles on the odometer (at his purchase) is correct. The truck runs like new and is used to drive to occasional Ontario car shows. It has not yet logged 1,000 miles since its purchase 25 years ago. If a show is two days long, Don uses his ½ ton to pull his travel trailer! The stock 235 six cylinder and 3 speed column shift transmission does the job.

1959 chevrolet pick up truck 1959 chevrolet pick up truck 1959 chevrolet pick up truck

1959 chevrolet pick up truck 1959 chevrolet pick up truck 1959 chevrolet pick up truck

1959 chevrolet pick up truck 1959 chevrolet pick up truck1959 chevrolet pick up truck

1959 chevrolet pick up truck

1972 GMC

Tuesday, May 1st, 2007

Owner: Mark Erickson

1972 gmc pick up truck

First I would like to thank all of you for great service and quality parts.

I started working on my 1972 GMC 4×4 in 1999. I did my best at a frame up restoration and am pleased with its turnout. I have never done anything like this before and it has been a great experience. I finished this truck in April of 2007. Still have some touch-ups but it is on the road. Thanks again and I can’t wait to get him muddy!!

Mark

1972 gmc pick up truck 1972 gmc pick up truck 1972 gmc pick up truck

1972 gmc pick up truck

1957 GMC Palomino

Thursday, March 1st, 2007

Owner: Ralph Wescott

1957 gmc palomino pick up truck

You can’t get more unusual than 1 of 1. This is how Ralph Wescott of Largo, FL describes his 1957 GMC Palomino. General Motors built only one! It was produced to draw attention to their truck display at the New York Autorama show in 1957. Fortunately, its prior four documented owners recognized it as special. It has been mostly in storage and only a few recent car shows have had it on display. The Palomino now has 9,350 miles and almost no restoration has been done. Even the original custom leather seat is free of age cracks. The engine sounds like new as it slowly moves out of its enclosed trailer. It occasionally may be driven in the neighborhood or at a car show.

Gm designed this special 1/2 ton around a fully optional assembly line model. This includes a deluxe cab, Pontiac V-8, Hydramatic transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, deluxe heater, Cameo style bed, windshield washers, etc. The manufacturer then added additional features that set it apart from the others. In the following photos note items such as (Palomino only) gold paint, custom leather seat and door panels, script trim panels over the front edge of the bed and gold floor mat.

One of its more unique items are the U.S. Royal Master tires. Ralph states GM requested U.S. Royal to produce 5 with this unusual rubber sidewall. After 50 years they are still in on their original 15′ rims! When not at a show the Palomino is in temperature controlled storage out of the sun to protect the leather interior, it’s original paint and bed.

Based on Ralph saying his Palomino is not for sale at any offer, we will refer to it as ‘priceless.’

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1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck

1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck

1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck

1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck 1957 gmc palomino pick up truck

1947 GMC COE

Thursday, February 1st, 2007

Owner: Steve Neilsen

1947 gmc coe

Having grown up in a family that always had delivery trucks, usually sedan deliveries I have always loved trucks. The first truck I remember was a black 48 Chevrolet Sedan Delivery. Ten a 50,52,54 and than we went to wagons. Still working for my folks in the 70s I found a 48 Chevrolet like my dads and restored it with the exception of installing a 327 and powerglide I got out of a wreaked 68 Impala .All black with white walls and gold leaf sign. After leaving my folks Florist business I eventually ended up in the remodeling business. I always loved COE’s and finally I decided to replace my new cube van with a truck that didn’t go down in value.

After looking, and running some ads I found my truck in Montana. It spent it life as a wheat truck. It now out of retirement and goes to work with me if its not raining. We’re both semi retired. I mounted the body on a 1980 Chevrolet 1 ton chassis. I installed a Chevrolet 350 crate,350 Turbo and 1990 Chevrolet van steering. The box was off a Ryder Rental truck. The wings on the box I got off a 1947 GM school bus used to store parts in a wrecking yard. I finished it up and after years of building cars this gets the most wows so far.

Happy Trucking, and thanks for the great parts,

Steve Neilsen
Red 47 GMC COE

1947 gmc coe 1947 gmc coe

1961 Chevrolet Apache

Monday, January 1st, 2007

Owner: Bob Rhea

1961 chevrolet apache

Here’s a recent photo of my 1961 Chevy Apache 1/2 ton, 98% on-frame restoration. Original 235 6cyl “Blue Flame” engine, Power Glide tranny.

1946 Chevrolet COE

Friday, December 1st, 2006

Owner: Jim Fassler

1946 chevrolet

I found this truck in Fall City, WA and it is now in Soldotna, Alaska. I shipped the truck From Tacoma Wa to Anchorage Alaska on Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE). I have driven it about 500 miles since I bought it.

Jim Fassler
Soldotna, Alaska

1946 chevrolet truck 1946 chevrolet truck 1946 chevrolet truck

1935 Chevrolet

Wednesday, November 1st, 2006

Owner: Ed Brouillet

1935 chevrolet

During the early 1930′s the US Army strongly encouraged General Motors to develop a light weight people hauler for their military needs. GM’s answer to this is what they called a Suburban. The finished product was placed on a ½ ton truck chassis. This allowed GM to use most of the existing items from their pickup. New tooling was only necessary for the body and seats keeping engineering and production costs low. The new Suburban had a wood framed skinned over sheet metal body. The doors, cowl, front fenders and front floors are all 1/2 ton.

As with the other earlier 1935 Suburbans a lift gate was not yet available. A canvas drop curtain was factory installed. The top is black oil cloth over wood bows which caused an early grave for these Suburbans. Once a top leak developed years later and more and more patches were needed, the interior began to stay wet longer. Rust and wood rot soon took over.

The featured early 1935 Suburban has been owned by Ed Brouillet of Fairfield, CT for about twelve years. It has been restored as new. Ed states it is the ‘first’ oldest Suburban. The other five 1935 models known to exist are not this low of ID number.

It is restored with a Swifts red body and black fenders. An original 207 cubic inch six cylinder is in place with a 3 speed floor shift transmission. It has most all details correct and looks as great as in 1935.

Fortunately, Ed enjoys showing his piece of history. It is seen at several shows in the New England area each year. His personal collection of antique hand operated house vacuum cleaners are displayed in the back. Ed always stays with his Suburban at shows. He loves talking to people about this first Suburban and his vintage vacuum cleaners. It can be a very memorable experience!

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1935 chevrolet ”1935

1964 Chevrolet

Sunday, October 1st, 2006

Owner: Gene Satterfield

1964 chevrolet pick up truck

This truck restoration took a considerable amount of time due to the repair of a lot of body rust. Thanks to the availability of parts from your company and the skilled work at the body shop I am pleased to say that the body is all steel (no fiberglass or bondo). All of the material received from Jim Carter was correct and of good quality.

This truck was my father’s service truck that he used in Florida and was free of rust. After my father died the truck was given to my son who brought it up to central NY where the winter salt wreaked havoc on the cab floor and corners. My son was going to restore it after 4 years of use and another 3 years of sitting outside in the weather doing nothing. I bought it from him and decided to return it to its original state which was a green plain jane with no chrome. My son received a flyer from Danbury Mint featuring the C10 Custom in White over Blue paint. My son said “Dad that is what the truck should look like.” So I bought the Danbury model and changed my approach to what you see in the pictures.

The engine, which is a 230 c.i., was in excellent condition and did not require any overhaul. The truck must be an eye catcher based on the many compliments I have received. I am pleased with having done business with you.

Gene Satterfield
North Syracuse, New York

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1964 chevrolet 1964 chevrolet 1964 chevrolet

 

1955 Chevrolet

Friday, September 1st, 2006

Owner: Tim Etes

1955 chevrolet pick up truck

Here are some of the before and after pictures of my 1955 First Series Chevrolet Truck, complete August, 2006.

My nine year old son and I did a lot of the work;including a significant portion of the body, mechanical and reassembly-finish work!

Purchased last March (2005) on eBay (from a person just seven miles away, ironically), he never had the opportunity to begin the restoration and reconstruction process. We counted up the number of parts we moved from his house to ours and it was in an amazing 117 pieces! He purchased the vehicle from a Colorado farmer and transported it to Wisconsin nine years ago, where he and his son disassembled it for a ground up restoration.

I went with digital gauges, but kept the original 235 Chevy 6, with the granny-low 4 for Parades and to better make the Fenton-Cherry Bomb combination sound better when I take off!

Nick-named the Killer Bee

Enjoy! We are!

1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck

1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck 1955 chevrolet pick up truck

1951 GMC

Tuesday, August 1st, 2006

Owner: Thomas Albers

1951 gmc pick up truck

This 1951 GMC is a family original. My father bought it new from the local GMC dealer in Fort Benton, Montana and has stayed with us ever since. For years this pickup was used to drive from town, to our farm and back daily.

In the mid 1960′s my father converted it to a farm service truck to haul fuel to the tractors and combines in the field. He mounted a PTO drive off the back and ran an air compressor and also mounted a second generator on the engine with a converter so he could run power equipment in the fields. My father was a very ingenious farmer and there was not much he could not do off this service pickup. This was the first vehicle that my brothers, sister and I learned to drive in the 1960s thanks to the patience of our mother and father. In 1990 my brother -in-law hauled the pickup to Miles City, Montana so I could begin a two year restore on it. The pickup had been sitting in a covered shed for years and was in very good shape with the exception of mice in the cab. The engine and complete drive train are original and I have done only minor repairs thanks to my father’s good maintenance habits on the pickup. I would like to point out that the color of the pickup is the original scheme and was matched to the firewall (that did not need to be painted). Then in the mid 1990′s I taught my son and daughter to drive in this same pickup by going out to the fairgrounds and letting them drive on the roads. During the restoration I counted on and bought a lot of parts from Jim Carter as well as getting some advice from time to time. They were invaluable to me and I thank them for helping save so many “never to be forgotten memories” for our family.

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1951 gmc pick up truck

Buy Parts for 1947 to 1955 Trucks

 

1941 Chevrolet

Saturday, July 1st, 2006

Owner: Jim Arrabito

1941 chevrolet pick up truck

In Feb 2005 I purchased my 1941 Chevrolet pickup off web site DealsonWheels.com. The truck was located in Sacramento, California. I live north of Seattle so I purchased a one way plane ticket to California. Upon arrival, two days later, I finally get to see the 41, stuffed in a small garage with boxes all around. Oil checks good, fill up low front tire, shake hands & turn over $$$. The previous owner shows me what is what. I’m now sitting in the seat, asking myself ” what just happened ? Oh yea, drive me home. I’ve got AAA”.

On the road in California I couldn’t ask for a better ‘ American Graffiti ‘ weekend. I got the value of the purchase price in that 1st Road Trip, plus the bed was filled with spare parts and boxes of parts. 1200 miles NO Problem, except that 80 mph speeding ticket ( “80 in a 41 ‘ really means something). back home I’ve spent the last year, fixing everything, from re-welding suspension, new bushings, shocks, radiator rebuild, ADDING wipers, bumpers, Cragar wheels, relocating battery, gas tank and Painting.

1941 chevrolet pick up truck 1941 chevrolet pick up truck 1941 chevrolet pick up truck

1941 chevrolet pick up truck

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks