Posts Tagged ‘1967’

Spring Noise

Thursday, February 11th, 2010



The 1967-1972 – What’s That Noise? Gaining speed after you turn onto the highway, your GM truck (1967-1972), moves toward a cruising speed equal to the surrounding traffic. As your engine reaches about 2,000 rpm you suddenly hear a low hum up front. It does not stop as the truck speed increases. If you lower the windows, play the radio, or turn up the fan blower, this hum is not so noticeable but it is still there. How will you locate this noise source when the truck is stopped?

No problem. Others have researched this mystery noise, discovered the source, and stopped it. Who would have thought the culprit is the hood springs? It appears that on many GM trucks of this body style, the two coil hood springs develop this hum (like a tuning fork) as surrounding air speed increases. The sound becomes magnified as it transfers to the large sheet metal hood.

This noise is easily stopped by filling the coils of the hood springs with a towel or carved piece of foam. To produce what a difference this makes, tap your hood spring with a hand tool and listen to the echo. It does not occur when the coil is filled with material.

Who said automotive engineers walk on water?

spring noise

1967-1972 Truck Tech

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967-72 Chevy Truck Model I.D.



We hope the following information on Axle, Transmission and Model identification will help many of you with your questions. Accuracy was a concern as we compiled this information. Because GM made so many scheduled as well as unscheduled changes, there is much discussion about these changes.

The following is used by permission from Pickups and Panels Magazine and artist Bryant J. Stewart

1967-1968

1967 1972 truck tech 1

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
13380 115 ½ ton El Camino (6 cylinder)
13480 115 ½ ton El Camino (V-8)
13580 115 ½ ton Custom El Camino (6 cylinder)
13680 115 ½ ton Custom El Camino (V-8)
C10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
C10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
C20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban, 8′ stake
C30 133 1 ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, 9′ stake rack
K10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
K10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
K20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban

1969-1970

1967 1972 truck tech 2

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
13380 115 ½ ton El Camino (6 cylinder)
13480 115 ½ ton El Camino (V-8)
13580 115 ½ ton Custom El Camino (6 cylinder)
13680 115 ½ ton Custom El Camino (V-8)
C5 104 ½ ton Blazer 4×2 (1970 only)
C10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
C10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
C20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban, 8′ stake
C30 133 1 ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, 9′ stake rack
K5 104 ½ ton Blazer 4×4
K10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
K10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, panel, Suburban
K20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban

1971-1972

1967 1972 truck tech 3

SERIES WHEELBASE VEHICLE TYPE
13380 115 ½ ton El Camino (6 cylinder)
13480 115 ½ ton El Camino (V-8)
13680 115 ½ ton Custom El Camino (V-8)
C5 104 ½ ton Blazer 4×2
C10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
C10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup
C20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban, 8′ stake
C30 133 1 ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, 9′ stake rack
K5 104 ½ ton Blazer 4×4
K10 115 ½ ton shortbed step/fleetside pickup
K10 127 ½ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban
K20 127 ¾ ton longbed step/fleetside pickup, Suburban

Disclaimer: This truck I. D. information is correct and complete to the best of our knowledge and is only to be used as a guide. Pickups ‘n panels and/or the National Chevy/GMC Truck Association, and Jim Carter Truck Parts, make no guarantee of accuracy, and disclaim any liability incurred in the use of this information.

1967-1972 Panel Trucks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010



These years are the ‘last of the breed’! Due to the increasing popularity of the new G-series van, panel truck sales had continued to suffer since the mid 1960′s. By 1970, General Motors panel truck production came to a halt. GM did not even wait until the end of the body series in 1972! This ‘enclosed body on a pickup truck chassis’ (used over 50 years) was now history.

If you ever see a 1967-1970 Chevrolet or GM panel truck, tip your hat. You are looking at one of the few survivors of the ‘last of the breed’.

1967 1972 panel trucks

1967 GMC Super Custom

Thursday, February 11th, 2010



The first year of the 1967-1972 series of trucks had various characteristics that were unique to just that one year. For the perfectionist, 1967 GM trucks are always a challenge. Because the 1967 GMC trucks sold in smaller numbers finding one with most of its original components is unusual. Even rarer is locating a GMC Super Custom. Trucks at that time were still considered more for work than pleasure, so few put the additional money in the extra trim.

The 1967 GMC Super Custom in these photos is one of the better examples of this top of the line model. This pickup is owned by Martin Trefz in Lake Lotawana, MO. It was repainted the original red several years ago and unfortunately had its wheelwell and side trim removed at that time. Most everything else except the non original wheels remain factory installed.

1967 gmc custom 1

The 1967 grille stands out as different than other GMC’s in this six year series. From 1968 and newer the GMC letters were placed on the nose of the hood and not stamped in the grill.

On the deluxe models, the unique one year only “Custom” die cast emblems were displayed on the front fender. These are now very rare and were often removed during a repaint or minor restoration because of surface pitting and lack of new replacements.

Of course, as with other 67 makes, there are no side marker lights. Federal regulations made these necessary in 1968 and up. Thus, fenders on 1967 are one year only.

During this first year, only the deluxe cabs had upholstered door panels instead of bare metal. Instead of vertical pleats as the Chevrolet CST, the GMC Custom runs their pleats horizontally. This was the final year that both of these makes used the same arm rests that had been on GM trucks since 1964.

1967 gmc custom 2

Like the 67 Chevrolet, this year GMC, did not have chrome edges on the dash cluster. The coloring is reversed from the Chevrolet on its plastic dash cluster. The outer edge and inner rings are black. The flat surface is charcoal gray. The metal glove box door is matching colors.

Even on this Custom model, the outside mirror arms are body color, not chrome. The steering wheel is deluxe only because of the clear plastic horn button. Below its clear surface is a chrome disc with GMC letters, just try to find a horn button like this at any swap meet.

Because it is a custom, it comes with a big rear window. The other 1967′s have a much smaller glass here. Stainless trim surrounds both the front and rear window. The wing vent assemblies are trimmed in stainless, not black as on the other models.

1967 gmc custom 3

One very unique feature on both Chevrolet and GMC in 1967 is the chrome wing vent handles. They are a carry over from the 1960-1966 series. The stud assembly attaching these handles wraps around the wing glass edge. There is not a stud hole in the glass as in 1968-1972. Therefore, this glass is a one year only item.

Even on the Custom (and the Chevrolet CST) the horizontal chrome strip on the hood edge and the front fender tips did not come out until 1968.

1967 Chevrolet Heavy Hauler

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967 Chevrolet Heavy Hauler

Wow! Now this is a real work truck. Used almost daily, it was bought from the original owner in 1985. This 1967 Chevrolet 1 ½ ton is a true heavy hauler. It’s original 283 V-8, 4 speed transmission, single speed rear end, and high output heater remains in place.

Home has always been Green Bay, Wisconsin. It’s first owner, a masonry contractor, used it for transporting bulk sand. Garaged in the winter, it stayed out of the snow.

Then 18 years later, it’s current owner, Mark Weidner., bought this 28,000 mile truck to help be part in his earth, rock and snow removal business. The truck was then given some upgrading to add to it’s appearance. This included new 8.25×20 oversize tires, new wheels, a replacement metal bed floor, white ash bedsides and fresh red paint of the original color. It then looked like new and nicely represented his company.

Mark’s company continues to use this 1967 on almost a daily basis. During about 8 months a year it hauls dirt, gravel, old concrete, etc. This truck becomes a snow hauler during the harsh Green Bay winters. The snow from cleaning local parking lots is loaded at night and dumped at a distant location.

The odometer has gone from 28,000 miles in 1985 to the current 156,000. It still looks great after the 22 years with Mark’s company. The secret is maintenance. Every 2 weeks it is water sprayed on the underside. On a 30 day schedule it gets a hot steam cleaning to remove more salt and road dirt. It’s original 283 V-8 has been given one rebuilding.

1967 Chevrolet Heavy Hauler

1967 Chevrolet Heavy Hauler

1967 Chevrolet Heavy Hauler

1967-1968 Buddy Seat

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

BUDDY SEATS 1967 1968 CHEVY

What an unusual seat on the 1967-68 Chevy/GMC pickups!  It was standard equipment on the “top of the line” Chevrolet CST and GMC Super Custom pickups.

The seat consisted of two bucket seats and a much smaller center cushion referred by many as a Buddy seat.  It allowed for a third passenger or the back cushion could be lowered horizontally to give an oversize arm rest.  When you lift the lower cushion there is a large storage area. All are covered with pleated vinyl.  Yes, three pair of seat belts were included.

The three cushions contained extra foam and better springs to give the owner a more comfortable ride.  These seats were part of a more deluxe cab that had not been available in prior years.  We have no documentation that they could even be special ordered on the larger 1 ½ and 2 tons.
BUDDY SEATS 1967 1968 CHEVY

Dim Lights

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When you notice your head, tail and dash lights are often dim, sometimes even flicker on a rough road, check your cab to frame ground cable

Because the 1967-1972 cab and radiator supports are seperated from the frame by rubber mounts. GM used a small mount woven wire ground strap that by-passes one cab mount. This insures electrical flow even if the cab mount bolts become rusted and electrical current can not flow properly.

You must be under the cab to see this by-pass cable. Yes, GM planned for the trucks later years when rusty mounting hardware caused the lights to dim

dim lights ground strap

1967-1972 Cargo Light

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The cargo light above the rear window on the 1969-72 GM cab was a factory option and is mostly seen on the more deluxe trucks. This light is controlled from a switch beside the interior dome light and is wired so it will not operate while the truck is in the forward gear. This prevents the bright 21 cp bulb from being on while the truck is on the road which would create road glare to following traffic.

To save GM production costs, the clear rectangular lens in this cargo light housing is the same as a 1969 Camaro right side parking light lens.

1967 Dash Knobs

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The 1967 Chevrolet and GMC trucks are noted for numerous one year only features. As the year progressed, engineers made several changes they felt were an improvement over this first year design.

For reasons unknown, dash knobs were redesigned. The following pictures show the correct 1967standard knobs with 1.23 inch diameter serrated edges. Compare these with the 1968-72 knobs having 1.4 inch diameter and smooth edges. Pictured here are several of the deluxe style having the center silver paint. Most did not have this silver addition.

1967 dash knobs 1

1967 Choke Knob – Standard (above)

1967 dash knob 2

1967 Light and Wiper Knobs – Standard (above)

1967 dash knobs 3

1968-1972 Choke Knob – Deluxe (above)

1967 dash knob 4

1968-1972 Wiper Knob – Standard (above)

1967 dash knob 5

1968-1972 Light and Wiper Knobs – Deluxe (above)

1967, 1968-1972 Hazard Flasher

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The 1968-1972 hazard flasher unit is not self canceling as in 1967. The only way to cancel the later hazard flasher is to pull the knob out. This feature was incorporated into the 1968 truck so that the hazard flashers could be operated when the vehicle is being used for slow speed operations. It became a problem in 1967, when the flashers would self cancel when turning on a job site or related small work area.

1967-1972 4 Wheel Drive Decal

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967 1972 4  wheel drive decal

This original, well worn, glove box decal was recently uncovered in a salvage yard. It relates front hubs on a four wheel drive and how to engage and disengage them. Our 67-72 experts have never seen this decal. Can anyone tell us if this was a factory decal or just added later when replacement hubs were installed? Please contact us if you have any information.

1967 Small Cab Window

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967 small cab window

On the 1/2, 3/4, and 1 tons, the small rear window was a standard feature during 1967. A large panoramic rear window cab was an extra cost option.

Beginning in 1968, the small rear window cab was discontinued except in the 60 series two ton. In this larger truck the small window continued to be standard through the end of 1972.

Thus, when you see a small window light truck in the distance, you can feel sure it is pure 1967!

Tailgate Trim

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

It was during these years that General Motors began offering more style to their pickup truck line. Though most still considered a truck as a work vehicle, a growing segment of pickup buyers were being strongly influenced by trim and accessories that even rivaled many automobiles.

For the first time on GM fleetside pickups, decorative trim became available on the tailgate of their middle and upper level models. Even on the basic gate that had no trim, the stamped letters were given a contrasting color. During all of 1967-1972, the middle and more deluxe series gates carried three upper strips making one line running the width of the gate. These three strips were the only tailgate trim offered for 1967-1968. During 1969-1972, an additional horizontal strip (66 3/4′ long) was attached to the lower gate edge but only on the middle series fleetsides.

It was on the top of the line 1969-1972 pickup that Chevrolet went all out in tailgate appearance. On the 1969-70 CST and 1971-1972 Cheyenne, the lower trim strip was replaced with a very attractive wood grained horizontal band at the center. Though it covered the basic Chevrolet and GMC stamped gate letters, the band carried its own chrome die cast letters over the wood (vinyl) decal.

The following photos show both the three styles of trim on the 1967-1972 fleetsides. Note the lower narrow strip is not placed on the gate with the wood band. Tail light rings or bezels are designed to harmonize with the tailgate trim. The 1967-1968 CST light trim is different than the later design.

tailgate trim 1

1969-1972 Middle Series (above)

tailgate trim 2

1969-1972 Cheyenne (above)

tailgate trim 3

1967-1972 Chevrolet (above)

tailgate trim 4

1967-1968 Chevrolet CST (above)

1967-1972 GMC Grills

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The main cross grill stamping making up the 1967-1972 GMC grilles may at first appear the same but they definitely are not.

The more noticeable difference is the large GMC letters stamped in the center of the 1967 grille (one year only). Therefore, these three letters are not placed on the hood front as during 1968-1972. Between 1967-1970, the vertical center bar (3″ x 10″) is slightly raised above the outer edges.

This vertical center bar on the 1971-1972 GMC grille is slightly depressed between its outer edges. This depression is painted satin black. At a distance, it gives the appearance of a split grille with two equal halves.

1967 1972 gmc grills 1

1967 (above)

1967 1972 gmc grills 2

1968-1970 (above)

1967 1972 gmc grills 3

1971-1972 (above)

1967 GMC Super Custom

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967 GMC Super Custom

1967 gmc super custom

During the first year of this new body design GMC’s top of the line was referred to as the “Super Custom”. An unusual piece of chrome die cast trim was added to this model in the center of the front fender this year. (not on Chevrolet) It is identifiable in the GMC Master Parts Book as: Group# 10.095, Part# 3903748/

It is now very difficult to find and probably will never be reproduced.

NOTE: This factory drawing shows the now rare full wheel covers, on the Super Custom.

 

1967 1972 GMC Standard Tailgate

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1967 1972 gmc standard tailgate 1

To make the base fleetside tailgate just a little different from Chevrolet, GMC kept their letters body color and surrounded them in a contrasting color. On Chevrolet just the letters have the different color.

1967 1972 gmc standard tailgate 2

1967-1972 GMC (above)

1967 1972 gmc standard tailgate 3

1967-1972 Chevrolet (above)

Blazer and Jimmy Speakers

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One of the most unusual features of the 1967-1972 series of trucks is the unique placement of the 1969-1972 Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy radio speaker. Unlike the pickup, Suburban, and large trucks; the radio speaker is not under the top of the dash. In fact, the dash does not even have grille slots to allow sound to come from a speaker.

Because of the Blazer and Jimmy’s removable top, GM knew that some would occasionally be caught in the rain. This would quickly ruin a speaker that was in the traditional location. Thus, on the 1969-1972 Blazer and Jimmy only, the factory radio speaker is in the right side interior quarter upholstery panel behind the front seat. If the vehicle did not come with interior rear panels, the speaker was out of sight at the bottom edge of the dash.

blazer speakers 1

blazer speakers 2

Radio Trivia

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

  • Push buttons were discontinued at the end of 1953 and did not reappear until 1967
  • Prior to 1959 radios used mechanical vibrator tubes. They would operate with either positive or negative ground. A low buzzing sound could always be heard from the tube area before the radio warmed up, once the sound began, the speaker made the buzzing difficult to hear. In recent years a major change has occurred. Vibrator tubes have been gradually replaced with a modern solid state style These are ruined if the battery is reversed. A positive ground tube cannot be placed in a negative ground vehicle
  • The 1947-1955 four staff cowl mounted antenna could be extended almost four feet. This helped pull in at least one station in rural areas
  • With a totally redesigned dash in 1954, the radio was given a major change. It remained AM only but with push buttons discontinued, it became almost half the size of the previous model
  • From 1959 and older, GM truck radios had two lead wires. One usually attached to the headlight switch so the dial light went on with the dash lights. The other wire attached to a 20 amp fuse and then to the ignition switch “hot” connection
  • The AM-FM radio was first available in GM trucks in 1970, not in 1967. These units have one sound track and are not stereo
  • In 1947, with the introduction of the Advance Design body style, GM trucks for the first time had a place in the dash to install a radio
  • In relation to wages, early radios were very expensive. A 1949 radio had a retail price of about $74.50 when it was difficult to carry $5.00 in groceries
  • The dash on the 1954-1959 GMC and 1955-59 Chevrolet has no place for a speaker opening. Thus, the factory speaker is placed between the sunvisors above the windshield

1967 Chevrolet C30

Friday, January 1st, 2010

Owner: Dan Kosteiny

1967 chevrolet

As luck would have it, I found this rare 1967 Chevrolet C30 pickup on eBay just 80 miles from home. I saw a reference to GM having built pickups with a nine foot stepside bed in an old dealer brochure. Surprised, I punched “9 foot box” into an eBay search, and this truck popped up. When I went to look at it, I knew I had to have it. I told the seller to pull it off eBay, as it was MINE!

I bought it from the second owner, Tim, who had inherited it from the original owner, an old family friend. Tim had first learned to drive in the truck before it was handed down. Originally purchased for Skagit Valley Sheet Metal, north of Seattle, WA, the truck was at some point fitted with a large cabover camper, so the bed wood and bedsides are nearly perfect.

I purchased the truck with just over 90,000 mikes on it. The truck is completely unrestored. It still wears the original paint, has the factory cloth and vinyl seat, and beige rubber floor mat, all intact. It came with the owner’s manual, the protecto-plate, factory build sheet, etc, all in the factory plastic envelope. It is equipped with a 283 cu. in. V-8, compound low 4 speed and 4:57 rear gearing. It is optioned with Heavy Duty auxiliary rear springs, HD battery, HD alternator, HD radiator and a front stabilizer, so it’s one tough truck.

What I find most unusual about this truck is the appearance upgrades it received. You would think that a 1 ton, nine foot stepside pickup would be purely a work vehicle, but this truck was ordered as a “Custom”, with the additional stainless trim, panoramic rear window, chrome hubcaps, and chrome front and rear bumpers. I believe this truck was a special factory order, and could perhaps be one of a kind. I’m amazed Chevy ever built this truck. It’s on it’s own 133″ wheelbase frame, and rides on 17″ split rims which are specific to the one ton pickup. According to the Chevrolet Pickup Red Book (Motorbooks International), Chevy built 526,776 light trucks in 1967, but only 4,026 were 1 ton stepsides – a fraction of one percent.

The only thing I’ve done to the truck is re-do the factory split rims, and remount the old 7.50 – 17 bias ply truck tires. Somehow, I found a full set of NOS chrome hubcaps on eBay. I plan to keep it as original as possible, for as long as possible. All it hauls now is dog! Jim Carter has not been able to sell me a single part yet, but he knows he’ll get me on my 14 other old trucks!

Dan Kostelny
Olympia WA
360-943-6333
ishnue@aol.com

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1967 Chevrolet

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Owner: Dennis and Bonnie Wegemer

1967 chevrolet

Hello to all! Here is our 1967 C10 with a 1993 step side bed. This is owner built with a 305 tune port 700R4 trans from a 1988 Trans Am. It has a tilt column, Dolphin gauges, billet gauge panel and glove box, classic under dash AC, hidden hitch, front and rear roll pans, Ansen wheels, and lots more.

This truck is Corvette Red and shares a garage with a 1956 Chevy truck, (which is Denny’s daily driver — he has put over 53,000 miles on it in the past four years), and a 1948 International Harvester panel truck, 1934 Chevy Sedan, Bonnie’s 1955 Chevy Belair Sport Coupe, and my new baby, 1977 Gremlin. Don’t hate!

Here is a link to other photos of the truck: http://public.fotki.com/sassychevy/1967chevyc10forsale/

We are in our late 50′s, and have been playing with cars since the 60′s. Denny has his tinmansgarage (his hobby shop-man cave), and Bonnie has her woodworking shop (her tree house). Denny is a machinist and fabricator by trade which makes it cost effective to play with old cars and trucks.

Denny and Bonnie Wegemer
sassychevy@charter.net

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1967 chevrolet 1967 chevrolet

1508 East 23rd St. Independence Mo. 64055   |   Phone: 1.800.842.1913

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