Posts Tagged ‘1946’

1939 – 1946 Grilles

Friday, August 10th, 2012

To keep General Motors truck costs down, Chevrolet and GMC ½ through 2 ton shared many components during the late 1930’s through the 1950’s. However, when it came to the grille, the focal point of the truck, changes had to be very noticeable.

The truck designers were limited in creating a new grille as both makes would still have the same front fenders and hood. For these limitations, the designers actually did quite well. They almost made them able to be exchanged from one make to another. On the 1941-46, only the small filler panel between the grille and fender top had to be slightly modified.

The attached photos show how two grilles can be different and yet fit in almost identical sheet metal areas of the trucks.


1939-40 GMC

1939 Chevrolet

1940 Chevrolet

1941-46 GMC

1941-46 Chevrolet

1936-46 GMC Taillights

Monday, July 2nd, 2012


1936-46 GMC Taillights

Though things were shared between GMC and Chevrolet trucks, General Motors made sure many items remained very different during the early years.  GMC preferred very few things to be similar to Chevrolet. Their customers needed to see an almost stand-alone truck with the higher price of the GMC.

One very obvious difference is the change in taillights. There is no comparison to Chevrolet. The massive GMC stamped steel one piece bracket combined with a redesigned 4 inch taillight makes the pair a “one of a kind”.  They do not interchange with Chevrolet during these years.

Finding any of these parts during a total 1936-46 GMC pickup restoration has become almost impossible. It is said a shop is attempting to remake the bracket, however, if that happens the taillight will be almost as big of a project to get. The light is not being reproduced.

Hint: This taillight was also used on Chevrolet, Buick, Oldsmobile station wagon tailgates from about 1949 through 1952.  Therefore, you will see more lights than GMC brackets at swap meets.

1936-46 GMC Taillights 1936-46 GMC Taillights
1936-46 GMC Taillights 1936-46 GMC Taillights

Same tail lights on early GM Wagons!

1941-1946 Park light and Headlight Assemblies

Monday, June 20th, 2011


At the beginning of the 1941 Chevrolet and GMC truck body style, the parking light assembly was placed on top of the headlight bucket.  This was the first time both were placed on the fender as a pair.  All worked well together.  To save tooling costs, GM chose to add a pre-existing assembly from the year before on the 1940 Pontiac car.  No changes were made from this Pontiac park light assembly except its long sheet metal top was now painted and not chromed.

Overseas during World War II, when civilian front fenders were used on GM military trucks (instead of the more famous flat fender ‘army truck’ style) General Motors created a parking light that emitted a small strip of light to be seen at a shorter distance.

Beginning in 1942 and continuing through mid 1947 (when this body design was discontinued), GM used a much less expensive park light housing on civilian trucks.  A one piece stamped metal cover was attached to the headlight bucket for a fraction of the cost as in 1941.  This also used a smaller less expensive glass lens.

Therefore during this 6 ½ year truck production (1941-Mid 1947) the same headlight buckets were on Chevrolet and GMC trucks.  The difference was their hole punching which adapted to changes in parking light assemblies.

1942-45 Military

1942-45 Military

NOTE:   THE 1941 PHOTO WILL FOLLOW SOON

1946 Chevy Short Bed Pickup

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Owner: John Thompson

This 1946 Chevy short bed from Pittsburg, Kansas, may look stock, however, it’s anything but! It is a blend of the character of the pre-war vehicles mixed with today’s technology. When I bought the truck it was almost all stock but it was in pieces strewn between 3 garage stalls. The truck is all steel and had virtually no rust on any of the body panels, but it was missing almost every trim, handle, lamp, chrome, interior, etc. Thank goodness for Jim Carter catalogs! The build began in January of 2008 and was completed in June of 2010. Modifications include the front suspension and frame rails from a 1970 Chevelle giving the truck independent front suspension, power steering, power disc brakes, sway bar, etc. The engine, transmission, rear differential, fuel tank, gauge cluster, seats, and more are all from a 1995 Camaro Z28. Several thousand hours went into the build with a lot of custom work including shaved drip rails, smoothed and reshaped lower grille panel, shaved front turn signals, rear roll pan, fuel tank relocated behind the rear axle and fuel door added to the left rear fender, custom door panels, console (with cupholders), customized yet original looking dash panel, and many other subtle mods. The paint finish is Dupont base coat/clearcoat and the interior is finished with genuine leather.

Other features include: power steering with tilt column, Hotrod Air Conditioning system, power windows, keyless power locks, 8-way power driver seat, 4 wheel disc brakes, rear air shocks, in-dash JVC with DVD player, power antenna, billet & leather steering wheel, composite headlights with integral turn signals, 3rd brake light, Haywire engine management and body wiring harnesses (all wiring was soldered and heat shrink wrapped), 17 inch aluminum wheels, one-piece V-glass windshield, billet drivers wiper, dual electric fans that turn on at 185o or when the a/c is on, and more. The interior was lined with Dynamat before finished and features full instrumentation including tachometer, and seatbelts. The bed is white oak with 10 coats of varnish.

1946 Chevrolet

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Owner: Dennis Odell

1946 Chevrolet

1946 Chevrolet

This month we feature a pick up that is used just the way GM intended.  It is still a work truck and at 65 years old it is used daily in the greater Kansas City, Missouri, area.  The owner is
Dennis Odell of Independence, MO.  The truck is a 1946 Chevrolet half ton.

Dennis now stays busier than on prior career job with the telephone company.  He can repair most anything ( including his 46) and thus is a natural with home repairs.  His little half ton is his daily work truck and hauls materials and himself for his many remodeling projects.

Dennis found it for sale 25 years ago beside a country road at the edge of town and had to have it!  He then personally did the restoration including the painting.  Dennis said he made it above average but not for shows.  After all, he planned on driving it to work daily.  About 12 years ago he retired and now  he and his 46 keep busier than past full time job.

The drive train is a 1977  250 cylinder engine  with a modern floor shift 3 speed and a 1955-56 Nomad rear end. All wheels are 5 bolt.  An under dash radio is his entertainment and the heater is from a 1950 car.  The body is all GM as are the seats, grill, bumpers, and bedstrips.  Yes, he did replace the bedwood.

 With it being used so often in all its years Dennis says it has to have over 250 thousand miles and is still going strong!!

 

1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet
1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet

1946 Chevrolet

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Owner: Jim Adams

1946 chevrolet

The owner is Jim Adams of Pleasanton, California! He has carefully rebuilt this 1946 Chevy 1/2 ton as one that would have been seen in the 1950′s. The big difference is that he created it as a high-performance vehicle of 50 years ago during his high school years. For the few that had money in those more difficult times, this is what many wanted to build.

This little 1/2 ton spent its early life in Hayward, CA as a fruit and vegetable delivery truck. Jim, about the fourth owner, bought it six years ago in a storage lot mostly as a cab and chassis. The tired bed nearby had numerous removed parts of questionable value.

At the beginning of the restoration, stock and reproduction parts were not too difficult to find. It was the high performance equipment that was the real challenge. They were gradually found with much time researching.

A few era additions used during the complete rebuilding  are: A 3″ dropped front axle, Edmonds water warmed intake manifold, Fenton headers, 1957 Chevy 235 engine with 1/4 race camshaft, chrome valve cover, two Carter YF carbs, and a high speed ring and pinion. Jim went modern on the brakes using disc on the front as well as a vacuum power brake booster under the floor. Even the seats are in a black vinyl roll and pleat design with a correct rubber floor mat.

The completed package is just right., an excellent restoration, early year high performance, and modern stopping ability. If it was in the 1950′s this little pickup would surely not take second place among any 6 cylinder or flathead V-8 cars or trucks.

When in any car and truck show, this truck is the one that gets the crowds! It is so unusual in these days of modern V-8′s and high tech add-ons.

1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet
1946 Chevrolet 1946 Chevrolet

1946 Chevrolet COE

Wednesday, April 14th, 2010

Year/Make 1946 Chevrolet COE
Owner: Billy Marlow


1946 chevrolet coe

1946 Chevrolet COE

1946 Ownerd by Billy Marlow Dayton, MD

By Billy Marlow

Although my family was in the coal business in Washington,D.C. for many years, and for a brief time I drove a tow truck for a living, my truck passion didn’t bloom until after I restored my 1946 Chevrolet Cab-Over (COE) and joined ATHS (American Truck Historical Society).

Always a bit of a gear-head and into anything with a motor, I saw the 1946 Cab Over in a truck trader publication in September 2000 and fell in love with its Art Deco grill. The truck reportedly spent much of it’s life on a farm in Oklahoma, most likely with a grain body on it. I bought the truck sight unseen and had it shipped to Maryland with the intention of fixing it up a little and having fun with it.

As many of these stories go, the next thing you know the truck was in a million pieces and a complete restoration had begun. I felt that it would be kind of nice to see this truck restored to near original condition. In doing so, however, I knew this would limit travel speed and distance. The chevy has the famous 235 inline stove bolt 6 cylinder engine. It is a 2 ton truck with a two speed vacuum rear, with 6.03 and 7.99 ratios, which means it tops out comfortably around 43 miles an hour.

I’m not exactly sure how I came up with the color combination, but I knew that is what it was going to be before I even took delivery of the truck. The paint scheme is definitely not stock, but folks seem to approve of my choice.

I am a building engineer at a country club near my home in Dayton, MD. and have worked there for 28 years. A lot of what I do from day to day helped in my first attempt at truck restoration. I did a lot of restoration myself, but had a hand with the engine, paint and body work. I spent many hours in front of the sand blast cabinet. Some of my best memories of the restoration were the days like the first time we started the engine, the day we set the cab back on the frame and the best of all, the first time I eased the clutch out and drove the truck out of the barn.

1946 Chevy coe

Right after the truck came home I realized I was going to need every resource I could to learn about my new project and to locate parts. One of my first tools I bought was a computer, and without the internet I don’t think I could have finished the truck. There are some great websites out there and folks who are more than willing to help.

I quickly learned that there are many parts on a cab-over that are shared with a conventional truck. After a little time on the keyboard, I was finding parts and pieces all over the country. Finding the grill bars proved a challenge. It took about two years to find enough to make a fairly straight set.

The truck was almost done around the summer of 2003-and six years later it is still “almost done” – when John Milliman twisted my arm to get me to come to an ATHS Baltimore-Washington Chapter truck show in Waldorf, Maryland. It was my very first time out with the truck and I had a great time. I filled out my ATHS membership application that day and also joined the chapter. I felt a little out of place at first among all the bigger trucks, but all that changed after our chapter hosted the ATHS National Convention in Baltimore in 2006. That was the first really big truck show I ever attended and it left a lasting mark on me.

I have had a wonderful time taking my truck to many shows, and have even brought two more trucks that I am working on now: a 1972 GMC 9500 and a 1964 B-61 Mack. My wife, Jennifer, is a huge supporter of my truck hobby, and I couldn’t enjoy all these fun events without her.

Jennifer brought her mother to the convention in 2006, and she was overwhelmed by the passion that the truck owners had for their beautiful vehicles. My mother-in-law is also a big supporter of my little hobby, and is responsible for having the beautiful signs made for the truck. The signs were made from the original Marlow Coal Company logo and letterhead, and its history is very dear to my heart.

People always ask me if my truck is for sale. After all the fun I had restoring it, all the fun I have had taking it to different events, and all the great people I have met becuase of it, I don’t think I could ever sell it. I guess there are some things you just can’t put a price tag on.

1946 chevrolet coe

Billy Marlow’s 1946 Chevrolet Cab Over is almost unrecognizable from the rusty hulk that he bought in 2001. A member of the Baltimore-Washington Chapter, Marlow brought his truck to the ATHS national show in Huntsville this past May.

1947 chevrolet coe

What started as something to fix up a little and have some fun with soon turned into a complete restoration. Billy Marlow saw the 1946 Chevrolet Cab-Over truck for sale in a trucker trader magazine and fell in love with its Art Deco grill. He used his skills as a building engineer to do much of the restoration work himself. (photo above by John Milliman, photo below by Kurt Lengfield)

Wheels of Time July/August 2009
www.aths.org
American Truck Historical Society

 

1941-1946 1 1/2 Ton Front Bumper

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A major change in large truck Chevrolet front bumpers occurred during there years. Prior to 1946 the 1 1/2 ton bumpers and braces were little more that a heavier guage design of the smaller 1/2 ton.

The big bumper change was in 1946. (Possibly this was because Chevrolet introduced its first 2 ton model that year.) Now it was nothing like those on the 1/2 and 3/4 ton.

This new heavier, stronger bumper design continues on GM’s larger trucks to this day.

1941 front bumper

1941 Front Bumper (above)

1946 front bumper

1946 Front Bumper (above)

1937-1946 Deluxe Heaters

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Keeping the passenger area warm in cars and trucks during the winter was always a problem in the early years. Not only were the heater fans and cores small but the vehicles used recirculator heaters. Thus, the air in the cab was recirculated rather than using dry outside cold air being brought inside and warmed. This helped for quicker warming but with more passengers, the additional humidity from breathing caused the windows to fog inside. A wiping cloth would have been needed to clear the windshield.

To address this issue, GM provided an extra feature with the pictured “deluxe” heater. A blower motor attached to the top of the standard heater made it a “deluxe” model. This separate optional motor on top forced warm air into the defroster nozzles and onto the windshield. There were two switches under the dash, one for each motor. In colder climates, it is doubtful the small heater core could supply warm air from the two motors both at the same time! Although this is antiquated by today’s standards, it did allow some relief on colder days.

GM Deluxe Heater 1
Optional Defroster Motor on Top-Estimated 1939
Front GM Deluxe Heater
1940-46
GM deluxe Heater 2
Air intake, back view ‘ Estimated 1939
GM deluxe Heater 2
1940-46
Optional Defroster Assembly- Estimated 1939
Optional Defroster Assembly- Estimated 1939

1940-46

1934-1946 Truck Tech

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1934-1946 Chevy Truck Model I.D.

We hope the following information on Axle, Transmission and Model identification will help many of you with your questions. Accuracy was a concern as we compiled this information. Because GM made so many scheduled as well as unscheduled changes, there is much discussion about these changes.

The following is used by permission from Pickups and Panels Magazine and artist Bryant J. Stewart

1934

Series DB…Wheelbase 112…1/2 ton pickup and canopy top pickup, panel, canopy express, spc. pickup/panel, chassis

Series PA/B…..Wheelbase 131..1 1/2 ton truck – single/dual wheels

Series PB…Wheelbase 131…1/2 ton pickup dual wheels

Series PC/D…..Wheelbase 157..1 1/2 ton truck – single/dual wheels

Series PD……Wheelbase 157….1 1/2 ton truck, dual wheels


1935

truck tech 1935

Series EB…Wheelbase…112…1/2 ton pick up panel,canopy express,suburban, spc, pickup/panel chassis and cab.

Series QA/B…..Wheelbase…131…1 1/2 ton truck single and dual wheels

Series QC/D…..Wheelbase…157…1 1/2 ton truck single and dual wheels


1936

truck tech 1936

Series FB…Wheelbase 112…1/2 pick up panel, canopy express, suburban, spc. pickup/panel, chassis and cab.

Series RA…..Wheelbase 131…1 1/2 ton truck single wheels

Series RB…Wheelbase 131…1 1/2 ton truck dual wheels.

Series RC…..Wheelbase 157…1 1/2 ton truck single wheels

Series RD…..Wheelbase 157…1 1/2 ton truck dual wheels


1937

Series GC…Wheelbase 112……1/2 ton pick up, panel, canopy express, suburban carryall, chassis and cab

Series GD…..Wheelbase 122-1/2……3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (11″ brakes)

Series GE…..Wheelbase 122-1/2……3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (14″ brakes)

Series SA/B…..Wheelbase 131-1/2…..1 1/2 ton chassis and cowl, open express, canopy express

Series SC/D…..Wheelbase 157……1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake rack, single/dual wheels


1938

Series HC…Wheelbase 112…………1/2 ton panel, canopy express, suburban

Series HD…..Wheelbase 120-1/4……3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack, (11″ brakes)

Series HE…..Wheelbase 122-1/4……3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (14″ brakes)

Series TA…Wheelbase 131-1/2……..1 1/2 ton panel canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, single wheels

Series TB…..Wheelbase 131-1/2……1 1/2 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, dual wheels

Series TC…..Wheelbase 157……….1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock dual wheels

Series TD…..Wheelbase 157……….1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock dual wheels


1939

Series JC…Wheelbase 113-1/2………1/2 ton pick up, canopy express, panel, suburban

Series JD…..Wheelbase 123-3/4…….3/4 ton pick up, stake rack, panel, flatbed (11″ brakes)

Series JE…..Wheelbase 123-3/4…….3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack, (14″ brakes) heavy duty

Series VA/B…..Wheelbase 133………1 1/2 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, single/dual wheels

Series VC/D…Wheelbase 158-1/2……..1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack, single/dual wheels

Series VE/F…..Wheelbase 107-5/8……1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack single/dual wheels

Series VG/H…..Wheelbase 131-1/8……1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack single/dual wheels

Series VM/N…..Wheelbase 156-5/8……1 1/2 ton COE m-single/n-dual wheels


1940

Series KC…..Wheelbase 113-1/2………1/2 ton pick up, panel, canopy express, suburban

Series KD…..Wheelbase 123-3/4………3/4 ton pick up, stake rack, panel, flatbed (11″ brakes)

Series KE…..Wheelbase 123-3/4………3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (14″ brakes) heavy duty

Series KF…..Wheelbase 133………….1 ton panel

Series WA…..Wheelbase 133………….1 1/2 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, single/dual wheels

Series WB…..Wheelbase 158-1/2………1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack, single/dual wheels

Series WC…..Wheelbase 193-5/8………School Bus chassis, dual wheels

Series WD…..Wheelbase 107-5/8………1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack

Series WE…..Wheelbase 131-1/8………1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack

Series WF…..Wheelbase 156-5/8………1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack


1941

truck tech 1941

Series AK…..Wheelbase 115………….1/2 ton pick up, panel, canopy express, suburban

Series AL…..Wheelbase 125-1/4………3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (11″brakes)

Series AM…..Wheelbase 125-1/4………3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatybed, stake rack (14″ brakes) heavy duty

Series AN…..Wheelbase 134-1/2………1 ton panel

Series YR…..Wheelbase 134-1/2………1 1/2 ton flatbed, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, single/dual wheels

Series YS…..Wheelbase 160………….1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack, single/dual wheels

Series YT…..Wheelbase 195………….School Bus chassis, dual wheels

Series YU…..Wheelbase 109………….1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack

Series YV…..Wheelbase 132-1/2………1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake/stock rack

Series YW…..Wheelbase 158………….1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack


1942

Series BK…..Wheelbase 115………….1/2 ton pick up, panel, canopy express, suburban

Series BL…..Wheelbase 125-1/4………3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack (11″ brakes)

Series BM…..Wheelbase 125-1/4………3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack, (14″ brakes) heavy duty

Series BN…..Wheelbase 134-1/2………1 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack

Series MR…..Wheelbase 134-1/2………1 1/2 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack, single/dual wheels

Series MS…..Wheelbase 160………….1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack , single/dual wheels

Series MY…..Wheelbase 160………….1 1/2 ton school bus chassis

Series MT…..Wheelbase 195………….1 1/2 ton school bus chassis

Series MU…..Wheelbase 109………….1 1/2 ton COE

Series MV…..Wheelbase 132-1/2………1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack

Series MW…..Wheelbase 158………….1 1/2 ton COE flatbed, stake/stock rack


1946

truck tech 1946

Series 1st CK 2nd DP…..Wheelbase 115………..1/2 ton pick up, panel, canopy express, suburban (1st only)

Series 1st DR…………Wheelbase 125-1/4…….3/4 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack

Series 1st DS…………Wheelbase 134-1/2…….1 ton pick up, panel, flatbed, stake rack

Series 1st OR 2nd PJ…..Wheelbase 134-1/2…….1 1/2 ton panel, canopy express, flatbed, stake rack

Series 1st OS 2nd PK…..Wheelbase 160………..1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack

Series 1st OW 2nd PL…..Wheelbase 160………..1 1/2 ton school bus chassis

Series 1st OY…………Wheelbase 195………..1 1/2 ton school bus chassis

Series 1st OE 2nd PV…..Wheelbase 134-1/2…….1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake rack

Series 1st OF 2nd PW…..Wheelbase 160………..1 1/2 ton flatbed, stake/stock rack

Series 1st OG 2nd PX…..Wheelbase 195………..2 ton school bus chassis

Series 1st OH 2nd PP…..Wheelbase 109………..2 ton COE flatbed, stake rack

Series 1st OI 2nd PR…..Wheelbase 132-1/2…….2 ton COE flatbed, stake/stock rack

Disclaimer: This truck I. D. information is correct and complete to the best of our knowledge and is only to be used as a guide. Pickups ‘n panels and/or the National Chevy/GMC Truck Association, and Jim Carter Truck Parts, make no guarantee of accuracy, and disclaim any liability incurred in the use of this information.

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

 

1946 Chevrolet Dually 1 1/2 ton

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1946 Chverolet 1 1/2 Ton
Owner: Jim Carter

1946 Chevrolet Dually 1 1/2 ton

1946 chevrolet 1 1/2 ton

1946 Chevrolet from Tommie Jones

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Owner: Tommie Jones

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 Chevrolet

I am glad that you have shown an interest in my pickup. It was purchased from a local theater in 1964 they used it to carry a billboard in the back. After purchase it was used to carry feed and seed on the farm. After purchase of a newer pickup my Dad’s employee used it to carry fuel and supplies to a bull dozer until the engine was beginning to fail. At that time it was parked on blocks with wheels removed in about 1970. Had thought about working on it on and off occasionally, but never did. I retired from the Texas Department of Transportation in 2007 after 26 years. Did some fence building, built a hay barn and added a room on my shop which was useful when I started on the project.

On the first of November last year put two of the tires that had been originally on it when parked and brought it to the shop. Spent about a week taking it apart and checking the condition of the parts. Saw that all the brakes and drums would need replacing. Had read it was best to get the frame and body worked first so removed everything from the frame and started sand blasting. After sand blasting everything was treated with Ospho and primed and stored inside. The battery box was replaced and the front springs which were broken. After this was together and painted checked the engine out. It had frozen where it couldn’t be repaired so decided to go with a 235. Didn’t find one, but did find a useable 261 from an old truck. Carried the head to the machine shop to be worked. Ordered parts and did the other motor work myself. The head was the only thing that I didn’t do myself. Had worked on the farm and Highway Department so experience on mechanical work. Now started on the body, had to replace windows, door handles, fuel tank and floor board. Only rusted out places were where varmints had piled dirt between front fender and cab. This was my first major body work and painting so that was a learning experience. Fenders were rather rough so had to do quite a bit of work on them. Looked at bed kits, but was in Home Depot one day and saw some wood I liked so bought. Cut to fit and grooved for bed strips. Had joined a local car club the first of this year and they were having a car show the last of September. Was close, but was able take it to it. Wanted to use original Chevy colors so checked paint chips and found the Suburban colors I liked. Left the grille painted because it was originally and chrome was so expensive. The colors are top Airedale brown and bottom Cireassian brown and interior the hammered tan. Again want to thank you for your interest for it was a very interesting project. All parts were purchased from Jim Carter except a few on e-bay.

Tommie Jones
401 CR 115
Comanche, TX 76442
254-842-5863

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1936 – 1946 Engine Dust Pans…Pure GM

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1936 - 1946 GM

During the 1930′s and 1940′s our Nations roads were dirt and gravel. Paving had been underway for many years but there was still a long way to go.

To protect engine componants from a constant attack of dirt, GM designed metal stamped panels that attached to an area where the engine block and oil pan connect. This slowed dust from collecting on moving parts and for certain around the engine air breather.

1936 1946 engine dust pan 1936 1946 engine dust pan 1936 1946 engine dust pan 1936 1946 engine dust pan
1936
1936 ?
1937- 1938
1939-1946


Over the years, these gradually fell from their attaching fasteners and found their way to the roads. Potholes and ruts were often the culprits. The vehicle owners and even hired mechanics tended to remove them during maintenance. They were rarely paced back into position.

Today finding a pair of these engine dust pans is almost impossible. Newer generations have no knowledge of their existance. These photos of the different years should be about 1936 and 1946.

If someone is in disagreement on the years, email us at info@jimcartertruckparts.com

1939-1946 Electric Wiper Motor

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

electric wiper motor 1

1939-1946 Electric Wiper Motor

Even if you prefer an original vacuum wiper motor for these years rebuildable cores have become very rare and most New Old Stock units are just not obtainable. Even new ones have their lubrication dry after 70 years.

For those that won’t except a slow moving or non-working used vacuum unit, an alternative does exist. New electric motors are now on the market in both 6 and 12 volt styles. The above photo shows a new unit before installation.

You will no longer need the original inside wiper cover plate with the indention. Replace it with the included non-indented style which gives a smooth finish.

The electric wires can be run inside the windshield post to a switch of your choice under the dash.

These kits can be obtained from Jim Carter Truck Parts at 1-800-842-1913.

1939-1946 Door Windows

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During 1939-40 Door window breakage on truck cabs became a problem. As the cloth fabric in the door window channel became worn, the large and now loose fitting side windows were susceptible to cracking when the door was slammed. Complaints from dealers resulted in an improvement on 1941-46 doors. A one piece metal frame was placed around the edges of the top and sides of the glass and the breakage was greatly reduced. To make room for these new metal frames, the glass on the 1941-46 doors was now slightly smaller.

Therefore, the 1939-40 door glass and 1941-46 with metal frame will interchange in total in all 1939-46 doors. The smaller 1941-46 door glass can not be used without it’s frame or it will not seal into the cloth channel at the top of the window opening.

1939 door window

Artillery Wheels

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The term artillery wheel is a nickname adapted from a scalloped type wheel often seen on US military vehicles in World War I. The similar appearance at a distance to GM’s scalloped steel wheels quickly gave them the name artillery.

On GM trucks, this style was first used during 1934-36 as a stock six bolt 1/2 ton 17 inch wheel. It was much stronger than the existing wire style wheels due to it being less susceptible to bending when hitting a large pot hole or sliding against a curb.

Though this 17 inch unit was discontinued on 1/2 tons for 1937, a redesigned 15 inch artillery began as GM’s stock wheel on that year’s 3/4 ton truck. It was stronger and wider but was still a non-split rim design. This remained the GM 3/4 ton wheel through 1945. By 1946, six bolt wheels on trucks were limited to 1/2 tons. The 3/4 ton would now have 15 inch 8 bolt split rims which remained stock into the 1960′s.

Today, we sometimes see 1947-59 GM 1/2 tons equipped with these early 15 inch artillery 3/4 ton wheels even though they were not placed on factory trucks after 1945. To many, they provide a unique appearance on the later 1/2 tons and will still hold the trucks current hub cap.

atrillery wheel 1

Regular 16″ Wheel (above)

artillery wheel 2

1934-1936 17″ Artillery Wheel (above)

artillery wheel 3

1937-1945 15″ Artillery Wheel (above)

1946-1972 Ring and Pinion

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One series of the famous “drop out” GM differentials was used between 1946 and 1972 on 3/4 and 1 tons. The complete assembly (often called a pumpkin) will interchange during these years with no alteration.

The highest gearing in this series is the 4.10 ratio and is found in most 1967-72 3/4 tons with automatic transmissions. Therefore, those “low gear blues” often associated with 3/4 and 1 tons during the late 1940′s and 1950′s can be greatly improved with no visible exterior changes. Originally these older trucks had a ratio of 4.57 in the 3/4 tons and 5.14 in the 1 tons.

Once a 4.10 pumpkin is located (usually in a local wrecking yard) it is a basic interchange requiring little more than new gaskets and gear grease. Your truck’s personality is now changed!

This interchange will fit perfectly if the “complete” pumpkin is used.  The 1963-1972 carrier is necessary and it will be part of this total assembly.  The change-over will not work if you only use the ring and pinion.

The only negative to this changeover is if you are hauling a ton of gravel up a mountain road with the original smaller six cylinder!! In this example a lower geared differential is best.

1939-1946 Replacement Seat Cushions

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Locating a pair of seat cushions for the 1939-46 truck has become very difficult in recent years. These early trucks increased popularity is the main reason for the shortage. Even when a pair of cushions are located the asking price often does not justify the purchase because of the age damage to the springs and frame of the lower cushion.

It is this lower cushion that has received the most wear in its 60 years. In a salvage yard the door or window left open for even a year allows rain water to soak the seat padding and hasten the damage.

As your hunt continues, here is a practical substitute that fits the cab well and gives the appearance of a re-upholstered original. Locate the common rear seat (not the middle) in a 1984-90 Dodge Caravan or Plymouth Voyager mini-van. You can even pull the factory levers on the back and the seat is quickly removed. Most salvage yards have many extras and their pricing should be under $50.00. You will even get the seat belts!

With less use of this rear seat in the van, you can find one with no tears or permanent stains.

The next step is cleaning. Simply place it in the bed of your late model pickup and find a coin operated wand car wash. The hot soapy water will make the cloth covered cushion like new for less than $5.00. Leave it in your truck for a few hours until the water drip stops. Then place the cushion where it can dry. In about 24 hours, the job is done! The padding is closed cell foam and does not absorb water.

You won’t need most of the lower metal attaching brackets. Remove them and attach the remaining metal and cushions to your trucks original seat riser. Here is where you can be creative but it is done and the remaining metal will not be visible.

For the perfectionist, the cab tapers inward as it reaches the cowl. Thus, the two doors are slightly closer to each other at the front in a standard cab. This new van cushion will touch the front of the doors because of this taper. If you don’t like this contact with the door, an upholstery shop can place a taper in the lower cushion to parallel the inside door panel. A small portion of the foam edge can be removed from the front sides of the lower cushion.

Continue to search for the original 1939-46 seat cushions. In the meantime, you have very comfortable clean cushions with seat belts. Most people will think you had your originals reupholstered.

The following article and pictures were received from Brett Courcier. He personally used this type seat and is very satisfied.

My name is Brett Courcier. I live in Fremont Nebraska. I own a 1946 Chevy pickup street rod. I wanted to take a few pictures of how my seat fit in my truck. I was trying to find a seat for my truck. I found a Plymouth Caravan minivan rear seat. It fit great. I cut off the latching pieces that go in the minivan floor and welded on a piece of 2″ square tubing to the front legs and a piece of 1″ square tubing to the rear legs. The pictures show them. My upholsterer added lumbar support to the lower back area and also added 2″ in heigth to the back of the seat. The seat comes with three seat belts and folds forward from the back of the cab. We added a full length pouch across the back of the cab for storage. I hope the pictures show enough for you. If you have any questions please contact me.

Brett Courcier

402-727-7127 or e-mail baccourcier@team-national.com

seat 1 seat 2 seat 3

Frame Horns

Thursday, February 11th, 2010


During 1941-46 a unique device was used in the front of both frame rails of Chevrolet/GMC trucks. It was designed to serve two purposes. This forged steel ‘horn’ was a spring hanger as well as a connection for front bumper braces.

These horns are securely riveted into the end of the frame and were designed to last for the life of the truck. Only more serious front-end wrecks will damage them. Usually the whole frame can bend before the cast iron horn breaks. Most were damaged due to lack of lubrication of the shackle pin and bushing. Finally, the pins wear through the bushing and then work on the casting. Finding usable frame horns in recent years have been very difficult. None are being reproduced.

Frame Horn 1
Left side with Frame Horn
Frame Horn 2
Right side with Frame Horn removed
Photos are by Judy and Dave Gaudet email: cohortva@shaw.ca

 

1941-1946 Horn Parts

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

One of the more asked questions on the 1941-46 GM trucks is regarding horn contact parts. Most have been damaged over the years and new owners are unsure how they were originally assembled.

Below, is a diagram from a 1940′s GM Master Parts Catalog and gives an excellent view of the parts used in the assembly.

Most items are currently reproduced, including the upper bearing, rubber bumper, cap assembly, steering wheel, mast jacket, 3 finger horn cap retainer, and internal cap spring.

Note: Added are the available part numbers from the Jim Carter Parts Catalog.

Horn Contact Parts

1939-1946 Suburban and Panel Doors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The unusual side doors on these Suburban and Panel trucks will fit on the more common pickup cab, however, their looks will tell the observer that something is not correct. Across the top of the outer skin is a horizontal stamping or groove. This groove is a continuation of the stamping that runs the length of the body to help strengthening the long sheet metal sides.

The pictures below should help you in obtaining the correct used door for your panel or Suburban restoration project. Tip: Even a badly damaged door from a Suburban or panel truck is of value. This will perfectly graft on a pickup or large truck door to make the rare item you need.

Suburban and Panel Door 1

Suburban and Panel Door 2

1934-1946 Door Handles

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The two series of exterior door handles on GM trucks between 1934-46 are certainly different yet they share a few similar features of interest.

One characteristic which seems strange today is that the handles lock the right doors only, not on the left. This occurs on GM trucks from the early 1920′s to about 1959. At this time, we have no reason for this feature. Maybe it kept the driver from standing too near traffic as he locked the door!

The 1934-38 handles are the same. The left has no cylinder key but the right handles are the locking style. Yes, the right and left handle will interchange but this is not the way it was done by GM. Switching handles would prevent the right door from being locked. There is no inside lock on the right!

With the introduction of the new body style in 1939, the handle design also changed, however the locking and non-locking handles remained in the same position. The big change started in 1942.

GM decided that rough roads plus freezing in the North caused too much lock breakage. The die cast lock parts inside the handle were too easy to break. During that year, the lock was moved down into the door skin. Both right and left handles became the same non locking design. The following photos show this big change in door locking on Chevrolet and GMC trucks.

Door Handle Trivia

The locking key cylinder used between 1934 to 1941 is the same despite visual changes in the handle body. Of course, if the truck is right hand drive, all is reversed!

1934-1938 Right

1934-1938 Right Door Handle

1939-1941 Right Door Handle

1939-1941 Right Door Handle

1939-1946 Left and 1942-1946 Right

1939-1946 Left and 1942-1946 Right Door Handle

1942-1946 Right

1942-1946 Right Door Handle (lock in door skin)

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

 

Early Rear Axle Bumper

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Mechanical components on trucks were usually kept for many years by GM. Unless an improvement was needed, there was no need to change a proven design.

early axle 1

An excellent example of this is the rear ½ ton axle bumper. The design was used from 1929 through 1946 on Chevrolet and GMC ½ tons. A rubber bumper is held down on the rear axle housing by a metal cover with two ears. These ears are firmly secured by the two u-bolts that connect the leaf spring to the round axle housing. If the truck is overloaded or the shock absorbers are worn, the rubber bumper prevents metal to metal contact between the axle and frame rail.

Two of the attached photos show an original used retainer with bumper in place. The black bumper (now reproduced) is how the rubber part looks when new.

early axle 2

early axle 3

early axle 4

early axle 5

1936-1946 Seat Adjuster

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Some beginners tend to place 1936-46 cabs in the same category. Don’t do this! The 1936-38 and 1939-46 are a totally different design. Very little interchanges. The early style provided excellent building blocks for the new design 1939-46 trucks.

One major difference (when viewing a base cab) is the placement of the bottom seat cushion adjusters. On the early design a three prong bracket for a seat adjustment is attached in two places to the back of the cab. See Photo.

Seat Adjuster 1

The new 1939-46 design gives a totally different way the lower cushion adjusts. It sits on four front to back above the gas tank strips. Two of these have small pegs which fit into holes in the cushion bottom. In this way the cushion can be lifted at the front and moved forward or backward.

NOTE: On both body designs the lower and upper cushions connect where they meet. Thus, at least the lower part of the back will move with the lower cushion. Unfortunately, your shoulders and arms will always be same length from the steering wheel.

Seat belts? Unheard of in the 1930′s and 1940′s.

Seat Adjuster 2

Premature Body Rust

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Did you ever wonder why the 1934-46 GM trucks show major rust on their horizontal flat sheet metal? The mystery is solved! These pictures show without a doubt what a wonderful home Chevy and GMC trucks provide for field mice.

After the truck has been abandoned at the edge of a pasture, placed in a salvage yard, or just stored in a shed after harvest season the little rodents soon find them. When the trucks are left alone for 5 or 10 years, just think of the 100′s of generations that have called them home.

This 1940 1/1/2 ton was recently trailered to our shop for a visit. It was removed from a Central Kansas field a few days before after years of waiting for a new home. It was being taken to Western Pennsylvania by its new owners Robert and his son Robert Galet of Jeannett, PA.

What a perfect place for a mouse house. No wind or rain and probably no snakes! The little guys just keep bringing in more nesting materials. They make more and more babies and of course we know what else they do that rusts out the sheet metal.

Attached is a picture of how this 1940 Chevy looked shortly after he got it to his home. The other photos show what was in place when they raised the hood and opened the doors. It looks like Robert Galet and his son will have a big clean up project. We don’t need to guess what the sheet metal will be like!

You can contact Robert Galet at rgalet@hotmail.com

premature 1

premature 2

premature 3

premature 4

Premature 5

Conservative Paint Early Trucks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In evaluating the available paint colors on 1946 and older GM commercial vehicles, one should keep in mind the general attitude toward pickups and large trucks during that era. Unlike today, customers bought and owned trucks for work! After five o’clock and on weekends most trucks were parked and the family sedan became the driver.

This relates not only to the lack of available GM truck options but also the very basic paint schemes. In fact, the standard color for General Motors trucks was a dark Brewster Green. They were sold this way unless you ordered one of the few non-extra cost optional colors. These were of special interest to commercial customers wanting a more visible truck or one that would fit in with their company’s color scheme. A few examples were: Swifts Red, Omaha Orange, Black, and Armour Yellow.

On the assembly line GM cabs and doors were painted bare (before any parts were added). This allowed all later attached interior sheet metal to be a separate color. This sheet metal such as the dash board, header panel , door panels, windshield post covers, and rear cab liner were even painted in a separate building and added to the cab on the line.

As a little extra touch, the interior metal was given a hammered appearance. This fish eye type paint is still seen today on new metal merchandise such as some brands of office equipment, etc.

Therefore, when you open the door of a correct 1946 and older truck, the seat riser plus floor edge and door frame are body color (painted with the cab). The removable sheet metal is the interior color.

The 1940-46 pickups and most all larger trucks were given a silver brown hammered appearance on inside to harmonize with all the factory exterior colors.

Interior Colors, Chevrolet 1940-46

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Serious early truck restorers often ask ‘What is the interior color of the original cab sheet metal parts, versus the exterior color?’ The answer for the 1934-46 trucks is simple.

The removable panels from the cab interior were always the inside color. If a component was welded in as part of the cab structure, it was sprayed the exterior color during the total cab painting.

This allowed successful coating of interior panels. As they could be placed flat during painting, there was a better guarantee of success for their specialty coatings. Wrinkle surface was placed on 1936-38 and a hammered appearance was used on most 1940-46 models.

Examples of these removable panels are the dash, rear interior corners, wiper covers, interior door panels, the above windshield cover, and upper door frames.

The outer cab color will also cover the seat riser and firewall as these were part of the total assembly. One exception is the rocker panels below the door. They are attached to the cab with screws but are the exterior color.

The two removable floor sections appear to be their own color, a black primer.

It is interesting that the interior colors in the finished new cab could have been painted even in different states and then the parts shipped to the assembly plant.

The following photos are of an all original 1941 Chevrolet truck interior.

exterior color 1

exterior color 2

rxterior color 3

exterior color 4

1946 Chevrolet

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

Owner: Tommie Jones

1946 chevrolet

I am glad that you have shown an interest in my pickup. It was purchased from a local theater in 1964 they used it to carry a billboard in the back. After purchase it was used to carry feed and seed on the farm. After purchase of a newer pickup my Dad’s employee used it to carry fuel and supplies to a bull dozer until the engine was beginning to fail. At that time it was parked on blocks with wheels removed in about 1970. Had thought about working on it on and off occasionally, but never did. I retired from the Texas Department of Transportation in 2007 after 26 years. Did some fence building, built a hay barn and added a room on my shop which was useful when I started on the project.

On the first of November last year put two of the tires that had been originally on it when parked and brought it to the shop. Spent about a week taking it apart and checking the condition of the parts. Saw that all the brakes and drums would need replacing. Had read it was best to get the frame and body worked first so removed everything from the frame and started sand blasting. After sand blasting everything was treated with Ospho and primed and stored inside. The battery box was replaced and the front springs which were broken. After this was together and painted checked the engine out. It had frozen where it couldn’t be repaired so decided to go with a 235. Didn’t find one, but did find a useable 261 from an old truck. Carried the head to the machine shop to be worked. Ordered parts and did the other motor work myself. The head was the only thing that I didn’t do myself. Had worked on the farm and Highway Department so experience on mechanical work. Now started on the body, had to replace windows, door handles, fuel tank and floor board. Only rusted out places were where varmints had piled dirt between front fender and cab. This was my first major body work and painting so that was a learning experience. Fenders were rather rough so had to do quite a bit of work on them. Looked at bed kits, but was in Home Depot one day and saw some wood I liked so bought. Cut to fit and grooved for bed strips. Had joined a local car club the first of this year and they were having a car show the last of September. Was close, but was able take it to it. Wanted to use original Chevy colors so checked paint chips and found the Suburban colors I liked. Left the grille painted because it was originally and chrome was so expensive. The colors are top Airedale brown and bottom Cireassian brown and interior the hammered tan. Again want to thank you for your interest for it was a very interesting project. All parts were purchased from Jim Carter except a few on e-bay.

Tommie Jones
401 CR 115
Comanche, TX 76442
254-842-5863

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet 1946 chevrolet

1946 GMC

Friday, May 1st, 2009

Owner: Charlie

1946 gmc truck

Charlie has owned this truck for over 30 years, since he was 12 years old. He bought it with paper route money. His parents said “What are you gonna do with that truck” he said “gonna drive it”. And he did just that after scraping out the oil pan and replacing the fuel tank.

Message from Charlie:

This truck drives like a dream, goes down the road straight, I sure am glad I took the time to redo the king pins spring bushings and bearings also it likes to roll with the tires I got they look like narrow original but are radials. At first I had a little trouble using the lousy gas of today it cleaned all the varnish off the floats that looked good which made them sink. Not a big deal quick trip to Napa and $14 dollars later ol red purrs smooth.

1946 Chevrolet COE

Friday, December 1st, 2006

Owner: Jim Fassler

1946 chevrolet

I found this truck in Fall City, WA and it is now in Soldotna, Alaska. I shipped the truck From Tacoma Wa to Anchorage Alaska on Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE). I have driven it about 500 miles since I bought it.

Jim Fassler
Soldotna, Alaska

1946 chevrolet truck 1946 chevrolet truck 1946 chevrolet truck

1946 Chevrolet

Thursday, January 1st, 2004

Owner: Denny & Bonnie Wegemer

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

Our 1946 Chevy Truck looks stock from 50 MPH or 50 feet away. My husband (Denny) did all of the fabrication and modifications and designed the chassis to comply with the air ride suspension. We moved the gas tank from under the seat to the rear of the chassis. The 305 with tune port, 700 R4 trans, steering box, rear end, and tilt column are all from a 1986 IROC. The front clip is from a 1971 Camaro. I t has front disc brakes. Our choice of wood for the bed and the inside cab area is Honduras Mahogany.

The 1947 Teardrop Trailer we worked on together. We stripped off 5 layers of paint and made it to compliment the Chevy Truck. I know you don’t do trailers, but this get up is a team. Denny did all the metal fabrication here also. We rebuilt the frame and put it on air ride also. The inside body was also reinforced with the tubing. It is now all insulated throughout. It is all aluminum and is riveted together. The size is 4 x 4 x 10′ long. The Honduras Mahogany really makes the inside cabinets look like the old vintage boats. I (Bonnie) made all of the inside cabinets and table and the cabinets in the kitchen area as well.

It helps to have a metal fabrication shop and a woodworking shop at your home.

1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck 1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 chevrolet pick up truck

1946 Chevrolet Suburban

Wednesday, October 1st, 2003

Owner: John Hart – Albuquerque, NM

1946 chevrolet suburban

I bought the un-restored Suburban in 1996 from a Kansas source I found in Hemmings Motor News. It must have been home to a thousand mice for 20 years or more; most of the stuffing from the seats was above the headliner, in the glove box, in the doors, etc. Where the mice had nested, the nearby metal was badly rusted from long term contact with urine; the shell was beyond recovery. Fortunately, I was able to find a solid Southwestern parts truck only about 20 miles from home.

The parts truck is a panel; it is identical to the Suburban except for the rear windows and seats. In fact, I checked the production codes and both trucks rolled out of GM’s Kansas City plant only one month apart. I cut the rear window panels out of the original Suburban, did the same on the panel, and welded and bolted the window panels into the panel truck shell. I turned a panel truck into a Suburban. The seats, interior window frames, fittings, and the like from the original Suburban were for the most part in fine shape.

I rebuilt or replaced everything down to the steering balls and spring shackles. It took me over a year, but I found 16-inch artillery style wheels. The engine is a rebuilt 235 with Mallory dual-point distributor and high performance coil. I installed Patrick’s 3.55-to-1 ring and pinion gears in the rear end and a Saginaw 4-speed transmission using Patrick’s adapter kit. This allows the use of the original torque tube drive shaft by shortening the shaft 2 inches.

The color is GM original Hollywood Tan with cream wheels and waistband. Fenders and running boards are black.

Many of the parts were purchased from Jim Carter. I have had it on the road now for about two years and it is lots of fun to drive. One thing about a pickup, you can’t fit too many people. With the Suburban, you can take the whole neighborhood.

John Hart

1946 chevrolet suburban 1946 chevrolet suburban 1946 chevrolet suburban

1946 chevrolet suburban

1946 GMC

Thursday, March 1st, 2001

Owner: Eugene Von Gunten

1946 gmc pick up truck

This is my 1946 GMC 1/2 ton pickup. It is designated Model EC-101. I purchased this truck two years ago from the man who restored the truck with the exception of the bed. He had built a wooden bed from pressure-treated pine. Fortunately, he had the original metal bed, which has its original all-metal floor; and it was in surprisingly good condition. I had a body shop sand blast the bed and my local vo-tech school did the paint work. I was given several old Jim Carter Truck Parts catalogs with the truck and found out quickly that Jim Carter is an amazing resource for owners of these trucks. I purchased the rear fenders from Jim Carter and they are clearly the best fiberglass parts I have ever seen.

The truck was featured in the May/June 2000 issue of “THIS OLD TRUCK” magazine. It is quite rare by comparison to the ’41-46 Chevy trucks it closely resembles. Happily, Jim Carter caters to both Chevy and GMC. I drive the truck frequently during the warmer months of the year. The 4-speed transmission requires double-clutching which is a skill that takes some practice. The tires are 6.50 x 16, which were an option to the standard 6.00 x 16. The result is a little better highway speed. I am considering the newer rear end gears to change the 4.11:1 to a 3.55:1. Of course, Jim Carter offers the parts.

The pictures were taken with a digital camera. The little ‘Rug Rat’ is my younger son Alex, who at age 2 1/2 is just in love with daddy’s ‘Red Truck’. Of course, the lack of seat belts means excursions around the yard are all Alex gets! I talk occasionally with other owners of ’41-46 GMC trucks. They can e-mail me at my home: gvg@infi.net

1946 gmc pick up truck 1946 gmc pick up truck 1946 gmc pick up truck

1946 gmc pick up truck

1946 Chevrolet Truck

Monday, January 1st, 2001

Owner: Bruce Pile – Rogers, Arkansas

1946 chevy pick up truck

I bought this 1946 Chevy truck after it had served for many years in the Bell Telephone System, the prehistoric internet that Bell Labs would later upgrade. After helping with the creation of the net, the truck was in pretty sad shape. The guy I bought it from had overhauled the 216 motor and was starting a restoration but wanted to sell it. Unfortunately, he had no antifreeze in the water, and, when we started it up as we were discussing the sale on a January day after a cold snap, it formed a boiling cloud of steam from the exhaust and a river flowing down the street from a geyser spewing out a crack in the side of the block. We discounted the price to $150 and my dad and I towed it home.

First, I dealt with the boat anchor I had for a motor. I disassembled it to the bare block, had the cracks welded, put it back together, put in some powerful stop leak; and to my amazement it ran just fine. Then I proceeded to the treasure hunt – finding the various body parts. It has original steel for everything, plus several items I ordered from Jim Carter. I painted it blue and black and drove it and showed it that way for several years. I loved the way it looked, but the running gear was just a little slow and weak for modern cruising. I had no trouble with the busted up motor, but the other things were becoming a problem. So 14 years ago I did a makeover. I had it outfitted it with a Chevy 305 V8, automatic, and an A frame assembly on the front from a ’75 Chevy pickup, which will bolt neatly to the frame with a pair of 3/8″ steel shims and provides power disc brakes and power steering. I repainted it the Swift’s red (now that it was so swift) and kept the body and interior as close to factory original as I could; there is no law that says you must deviate from the natural beauty of these trucks just because you put in a V8. You can certainly improve how they drive, but, in my opinion, you can’t improve much on what the staff at Chevrolet thought out for how their trucks should look. It was restoring the body and interior to factory original that was the most difficult part of the entire project. Finding the parts was not easy, and Jim Carter’s was the ace up my sleeve there; but far more difficult was finding reliable information as to what was factory original. It was here that Jim Carter’s proved to be a unique resource. I inquired at salvages that are highly regarded for specializing in antique trucks, and got either “I don’t know” or contradictory information. I e-mailed the AACA in Hershey and got “We don’t know. Try these three organizations.” I e-mailed the customer service arm of Chevrolet, which is supposed to be able to answer all your questions about models past and present, and got “We have used all the resources at our disposal and can not answer your questions.” I asked Jim Carter’s and they either gave me answers immediately or said, “We’ll check and e-mail you an answer”, which they did. After having received so much contradictory information from other sources, I was not convinced. I hunted down some old photos of Chevy trucks fresh off the assembly line and some with no restoration or refinishing done, and hunted down several trucks in salvages, examined them very carefully, and got a few answers as to what parts and colors were original; and they were the same answers Jim Carter gave me. If I ever do another project with a GMC or Chevy truck, I’ll not bother with any other source of parts or information besides salvage yards and Jim Carter’s Antique Truck Parts.

I’ve been driving my antique for 14 years and am still pleasantly embarrassed by all the head turning it gets. I still have a “to do” list of 7 items. I’d also like to add a license plate holder that reads “Prehistoric Silverado”.

1946 chevy pick up truck 1946 chevy pick up truck 1946 chevy pick up truck

1946 chevy pick up truck 1946 chevy pick up truck 1946 chevy pick up truck

1946 chevy pick up truck

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

 

1508 East 23rd St. Independence Mo. 64055   |   Phone: 1.800.842.1913

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