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Trim

Mirror Polish Trim

Friday, January 24th, 2014

The set of 12 mirror polished stainless trims used on the 1947-54 deluxe Chevrolet panel truck. Includes the needed attaching clips. Show quality Part Number TRT400 – set $1,550.00.

1937 Chevrolet Lower Bar

 

The long mirror polished stainless trim that secures to the upper front fender of the 1947-54 Chevrolet deluxe panel truck. Securing clips are built into strip. Show quality Part Number TRT402 – Pair $195.00.

1937 Chevrolet Lower Bar

 

NOW IN STOCK!
Rear door light switch. For rear left double door and door post on 1937-54 panel truck. Factory indentions are in the body and door. Many new parts make this switch fit just right.
Part Number EL409 – Pair $69.50.

1937 Chevrolet Lower Bar 1937 Chevrolet Lower Bar

 

Proper 3100 Hood Side Emblem

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the Advance Design years no less than four different Chevrolet hood side emblems were used on 1/2 tons. Each of their two mounting pins are in the same place so the punched hood holes were unchanged during these years. All were chromed die cast even during the 1952-1953 Korean war chrome shortage.

The following pictures show the correct emblem for each of the years. Beware, some vendor’s catalogs do not list them correctly.

Note: Between mid-1949 through 1951, a separate small 3100 emblem was placed below the Chevrolet letter plate. Therefore, hoods during these years will have two additional factory punched holes. The longer Chevrolet emblem used between 1949-1952 are the same.

proper 3100 1

1949-1951 3100 Emblem (above)

proper 3100 2

1955 First Series (above)

proper 3100 3

1952 (above)

proper 3100 4

1953-1954 (above)

proper 3100 5

1947-1949 Thriftmaster (above)

Hood Ornament, 1947 – Early 1955

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the 1947-1955 years, no less than four different front hood emblems were used during regular production on the Chevrolet 3000 series trucks. Though all can be made to interchange during this 7 1/2 year series; for the perfectionist, there are only certain types for certain years.

hood ornaments 1a

In 1947, the 1/2, 3/4, and 1 ton Chevrolet trucks began production by displaying a chrome plated die cast emblem with dimensions of 3-3/8″ x 19″. The Chevrolet letters across the center are red and a small royal blue “BOWTIE” is above. On the back side their four attaching points (part of the casting) are threaded and extend outward to better provide metal to hold the securing screws. Because of the length of these four extensions, the hood must be provided with appropriate dimples. These dimples are necessary so the emblem can be pulled snug against the hood front.

Sometime in late 1948 and early 1949, depending on the assembly plant, this emblem changed to chrome plated stamped steel. Visually, it has the same dimensions and painting as the earlier style but is much less in weight.

In late 1952, the front of this emblem was again changed. It was now stainless steel. The four hood attaching clips (welded to the front stainless) and the threaded studs remained plain steel as in the prior style. The dimensions were as in past years. This design was carried through all of 1953. Forty five years later this stainless steel emblem is often seen at flea markets with the front skin in excellent condition but the four welded-in clips either gone or rusted beyond repair. These clips, hidden between the stainless emblem skin and the hood front, did not dry quickly between rains and the morning dew.

Because the hoods are larger on the 4000 and 6000 series 1-1/2 and 2 top Chevrolet trucks, the front emblem was formed to conform to their bigger size. Width and length dimensions are the same as the smaller 3000 series trucks and will interchange. However, to help compensate for the larger hood size, these big truck emblems are almost 1/4″ thicker at their widest point in comparison to the smaller 3000 series. Their construction materials changed during this series as did the smaller 3000 series trucks.

The 5000 series Chevrolet COE bodies (CAB OVER ENGINE) did not change their initial die cast hood emblem. It continued identical from it’s 1947 introduction through 1953. The dimensions 3-1/2″ x 26-1/2″ were much longer than the conventional cabs due to the COE’s massive one piece hood.

The 1954-1955 hood emblem was a different design and better related with the totally new grille. As Chevrolet was now stamped on the top grille bar, these letters were no longer on the emblem. The “BOWTIE” trademark became larger and the overall emblem continued with a stainless skin and plain steel inside attachments overall dimensions on the 3000 series trucks is 3-7/8″ x 21″. With this new design, the clips did not extend back as in prior years. Therefore, the dimples were not stamped in the hood. This is a quick way to tell the 1954-1955 from the earlier 1947-1953 hoods.

On the 4000 and 6000 series the 1954-55 Chevrolet emblem has an overall increase in size of approximately 20% or 4-1/8″ x 24″. This was necessary to better conform with the larger truck hood. The emblem remained a stainless steel stamping with the same appearance as the smaller trucks.

General Motors designed the 5000 series or COE emblems on the 1954-55 the same in size and style as those on the conventional cab large truck hoods with two exceptions. This COE emblem is chrome plated die cast and lacks the notches for the bullnose strip. The unique one piece size of the COE hood eliminated the need for a center divider strip and thus no center notches were in the emblem.

Early 1955 COE

All the truck “BOWTIE” emblems in 1954-1955 were Chevrolet royal blue however the valleys between the twenty four vertical ridges were painted red in 1954 and white on the early 1955 series. The GMC trucks between 1947-55 did not have a front hood emblem. Die cast GMC letters were attached to an upper grille housing.

Hood ornaments were an important part of automotive styling in the 1940’s through 50’s. However, as trucks were basically for work GM created specific ornaments for these vehicles but made them a dealer accessory. They are rare and in demand today as hobbyists now look for General Motors accessories to add to their restored trucks.

To help the dealer install the 1947-1953 Chevrolet accessory ornament correctly, the factory placed a small hole between the hood halves 33″ from their rear edge. This is for positioning the rear threaded stud of the ornament. The dealer would then drill two pair of holes on either side of the hood divider strip and the result was a perfect fit.

On the 1954-1955 Chevrolets, the accessory ornament was totally changed in design. A chrome eagle with low wings was attached to a die cast base. To save expenses GM used the same eagle that was also an accessory on 1953-54 Chevrolet passenger cars. The mounting base was not the same partially due to the difference in the width of car and truck hood bullnose strips. Between 1947-55, the dealer installed GMC accessory hood ornament did not change. It had a very narrow die cast mounting base attaching directly to the bullnose strip. This supports an attractive streamlined jet plane. It does not resemble the Chevrolet ornament.

GMC Hood Ornament

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

These chrome hood ornaments were exclusively tooled for GMC trucks and have no similarity to the Chevrolet style. They are made up of three attached die cast pieces to create the finished product. Their slim base secures to the center of the hood divider strip.

These were dealer installed GMC accessories. As trucks at that time were mostly for work responsibilities, few owners had an interest in appearance options. Thus, these hood ornaments were rarely seen on trucks when new. Locating new or restorable unit 50 years later is almost an impossibility

gmc hood ornament 1

1954-1955 GMC Bed Reflector

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

By 1954, the Korean War shortages were history. More trim and chrome plating began to show up in trucks and cars. The Chevrolet and GMC truck divisions both introduced a deluxe model for their pickups during mid-year 1954. Hopes were to appeal to the emerging buyers with more disposable income.

The deluxe model of these two trucks shared most of the same sheet metal, however special unique items kept each individual! One of these exclusive items was used only on the top of the line GMC pickup. This was the bed-roll reflector. It was never placed on Chevrolets or the basic GMC pickup.

In today’s world this extra is almost impossible to locate. Not only was it on the deluxe GMC’s but few of these top of the line models found buyers. Most still thought of trucks as workers and ordered the basic vehicle. This reflector is on the very end of the bed roll and it is exposed to being damaged while backing.

To save tooling costs, GMC designers borrowed the red reflector lens from the 1953 Buick taillight. Unfortunately, the stainless ring (riveted to the bed roll) is exclusive only to the rare deluxe GMC pickup.

1954 gmc bed reflector 1

1954 gmc bed reflector 2

1954 gmc bed reflector 3

1954 gmc bed reflector 4

1954 First Chevrolet Truck Wheel Cover

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

1954 wheel cover 1

It’s 1954 and the Korean War is now history. The wholesale price of non-ferrous metal such as chrome, stainless steel, nickel and copper are dropping. American have more disposable income and are beginning to ask for deluxe accessories on their trucks instead of just for the family sedan.

Of the many accessories introduced in 1954, the full wheel cover was a first for any Chevrolet pickup. These stainless steel covers were not borrowed from Chevrolet cars. They were exclusive for the 1/2 ton pickup 16′ wheel. These were Chevrolet dealer installed accessories and not added on the assembly line.

Today, locating a restorable set of these unusual accessories is very difficult. Many sets that were left over in dealer stock probably found their way to the used car lot to dress up a trade in.

Note: Don’t confuse these covers with the 1947-48 Chevrolet car, deluxe 16′ wheel covers. They have red centers and a different stamping in this area.

1954 wheel cover 2

Difference – 1947-55 GMC Grills

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the Advance Design years, 1947-55, Chevrolet and GMC each changed their grill designs twice. GMC made the change at the end of the second year and Chevrolet made the change at the end of the seventh year.

Possibly to save tooling cost GMC, not Chevrolet, always used the same grill on all truck sizes in any one year. As Chevy used a similar but slightly larger grill on their 1 1/2 and 2 ton. GMC did not change the size on trucks between 1/2 and 2 tons.

In 1947-48 GMC used a three bar heavy gauge chrome steel grill. Actually, it was for the heavy weight for the 2 tons but fit in the 1/2 ton by using a smaller grill surround.

The big grill change for GMC was in 1949 when it was made as a four bar design. To the non truck enthusiast, it looked somewhat like the earlier years which is probably what GMC designers planned.

Current GMC grill reproductions are often sold as 1947=55. Actually they are the four bar type for 1949-55. The 1947-48 GMC owners get a surprise due to the modifications needed to fit the later reproduction grill into their early housing!

Click on images below to enlarge

1947-1948 Three Bar Grill 1947-1948 Three Bar Grill C.O.E Four Bar Grill
Three to Five Ton Four Bar Grill
Half Ton to One Ton Four Bar Grill
Half Ton to One Ton Four Bar Grill

Hub Caps-Used 15 Years

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Many of the tech articles on this web site emphasis’s the subtle ways that truck parts were made economically by GM. Truck often received Chevrolet car items that were used the year before. Sometimes even other GM brands sent their older items to be placed on assembly line trucks.

Of all the ways GM saved money on truck parts, none is more unique than the savings on 1/2 ton hub caps. Chevrolet pickups used the same baby moon style hub cap from 1940 through 1955. The skins and basis are the same. A relative inexpensive addition was simply changing the lettering or emblems on the outer brass skin. They required a change in tooling, not expensive for a company the size of the Chevrolet Motor Division. The stamping department just kept making the same base and skins. The skin surface stamping changed as was required by the design department each year.

Check the following pictures. The base hub caps are all the same. Some of the car hub caps are the same as the trucks. Even GMC trucks decided to use these caps between 1947-55. After all, just placing the three GMC letters on the skin added much savings to the company’s bottom line.

hub caps 1

1940 Chevrolet 1/2, 3/4 ton and car (above)

hub cap 2

1941-1946 1/2 ton, 1941- 1945 3/4 ton, and 1942 -1948 car (above)

hub cap 3

1947-1951 GMC, Chrome (above)

hub cap 4

1947-1951 Chevrolet, Chrome (above)

hub cap 5

1954-1955 1st Chevrolet (above)

hub cap 6

1952-1953 Chevrolet Painted (above)