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WD 40 Who Knew?

Friday, December 1st, 2017

WD-40 Who Knew?
What is the Main Ingredient of WD-40?
Before you read to the end, does anybody know what the main ingredient of WD-40? No Cheating WD-40 ~ Who knew!

I had a neighbor who bought a new pickup. I got up very early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for some unknown reason). I went over, woke him up, and told him the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do. .. probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open. Another neighbor came out and told him to get his WD-40 and clean it off. It removed the unwanted paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job that was on the truck. I was impressed!

WD -40 who knew? “Water Displacement #40”. The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and de-greaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953, by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a ‘Water Displacement’ Compound. They were finally successful for a formulation, with their fortieth at-tempt, thus WD-40. The ‘Convair Company’ bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts. Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.

When you read the ‘shower door’ part, try it. It’s the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as on glass. It’s a miracle! Then try it on your stove-top. It’s now shinier than it’s ever been. You’ll be amazed.

WD-40 Uses:

1. Protects silver from tarnishing.
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
4. Gives floor that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery.
5. Keeps the flies off of Cows, Horses, and other Farm Critters, as well. (Ya gotta love this one!!!)
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.
7. Removes lipstick stains.
8. Loosens stubborn zippers.
9. Untangles jewelry chains.
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
11. Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
12. Keeps ceramic/terracotta garden pots from oxidizing.
13. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
14. Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
15. Camouflages scratches on ceramic and marble floors.
16. Keeps scissors working smoothly.
17. Lubricates noisy door hinges on both home and vehicles doors.
18. It removes that nasty tar and scuff marks from the kitchen flooring. It doesn’t seem to harm the finish and you won’t have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off.
Just remember to open some windows, for ventilation, if you have a lot of marks.
19. Remove those nasty bug guts that will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly!
20. Gives a children’s playground gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
21. Lubricates gearshift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers.
22. Rids kids rocking chair and swings free of squeaky noises.
23. Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
24. Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
25. Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
26. Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
28. Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
29. Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
30. Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
31. Removes grease splatters from stove-tops.
32. Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
33. Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
34. Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
35. Removes all traces of duct tape.
36. Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
37. Florida’s favorite use is: ‘cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.’
38. The favorite use in the state of New York, it protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
39. WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it’s a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants
that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
40. Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
41. It is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray it on the marks and wipe with a clean rag.
42. Also, if you’ve discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and re-wash.
Presto! The lipstick is gone!
43. If you spray it inside a wet distributor cap, it will displace the moisture, allowing the engine to start.

P.S. As for that Basic, Main Ingredient

Well…. it’s FISH OIL!!!

Advanced Design Trucks Produced into the 1960’s

Monday, March 28th, 2016

The famous 1947-55 Advance Design Trucks were so popular in the US that GM just could not let them go. Overseas factories used this basic US tooling for their version of the Advance Design trucks. This continued for many years after they had been discontinued on US assembly lines. Look at some of these trucks in other countries using GM’s older tooling. Doesn’t this cab tooling stand out as was used in the US during 1947-55? How interesting that these new trucks were still found new over the planet for at least another 10 years!

The mechanicals may be different but the cab is so familiar!

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1956 Opel – German                                                 1962 Bedford – India

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1961 Assembled in Brazil                                       1957 Bedford – England

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1956 Bedford – Australia                                          1959 Bedford – Scotland

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1956 Bedford for Shows!                                   1961 Bedford Restored in England

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1962 Bedford “House Truck”                                1960 Bedford Bed.  A little different.

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Nice 1959 1 1/2 ton – New Zealand

Late 1947 Chevrolet GMC Trucks

Monday, March 28th, 2016

General Motors wisdom had it correct. They waited about 2 years after the end of WWII before introducing a new truck body design in mid-year 1947. With the returning military from overseas the truck sales (and all other cars & trucks) with pre-war older designs were selling faster than the factories could produce them. GM continued with the same trucks that the returning soldiers had seen before the war began. Customers bought them as fast as they became available. America had been without vehicles to purchase during the war years and most were ready to buy any NEW truck or car. They bought whatever had the appearance of a new vehicle.

As expected GM noticed the Chevrolet and GMC truck market beginning to be saturated, and it was time to begin selling the NEW body design. These General Motors trucks, developed in the mid 1940’s, had their tooling created and waiting on what GM knew would happen. Fill the truck high demand with the pre-war existing tooling and then introduce a new truck body a few years later to start another rush to the dealer’s showrooms.

Both the Chevrolet and the GMC trucks were referred to as the “Advance Design” style beginning in mid-1947. They were so popular GM continued with the basic design over seven years and then the tooling was sent to other countries where at least the cabs were continued into the 1960’s.  See an adjacent tech article on these overseas AD trucks is now available on our website.   The following four photos will show the 1947 body change.

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Early 1947 Chevy                                                      Mid 1947 Chevy

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Early 1947 GMC                                                        Mid 1947 GMC

1954-55 Chevrolet Deluxe Cab Arm Rest

Friday, February 19th, 2016

When the 1954 Chevrolet deluxe pickup was introduced (about two months into the production year) they came with a different design arm rest not used before. It wasn’t even found on the assembly line produced standard 1954-55 pickups!

Because the door panels and painted interiors of this new deluxe cab had four color choices, GM realized they could not use the one color fits all arm rest that had been available since 1947.

Thus, the introduction of the plastic arm rest molded in the four colors with top pad. These matched the four color coordinated door panels.

Such a rare option or accessory! Unfortunately after several years in summer or winter temperature extremes the old formula plastic base cracked or otherwise began to deform. This leaves almost none in existence except those possibly found on back storage shelves at a GM dealership. Even a new in the box unit would now be about 60 years old!

The following is the top of a page from the 1955 Chevrolet Master Parts Catalog. These manuals were once sent to all Chevrolet Dealers each year. They show what is available that the dealer could buy from GM and their suggested retail price.

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These may be reproduced by Jim Carter Truck Parts. Yes, we just bought the one in the photo, still in a GM box, to use as a pattern. Stay tuned.

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Big Truck Front Bumpers

Monday, June 15th, 2015

Shortly after WWII the Chevrolet Truck Division introduced a heavier truck with a maximum gross weight of 16,000 pounds and was rated as a 2 ton. Up to this time their top rated truck had been 1 ½ tons with a gross weight of 14,000 pounds.

With this increase, a major change occurred in the front bumper. No longer was this bumper little more than a heavy duty ½ ton. They now used a totally different design. A top and bottom horizontal ridge and additional thickness did much to prevent bending when pushing another vehicle or by an accident.

The 1 ½ and 2 ton bumper, introduced in 1946 was not continued through the next series of trucks, 1947 through 1953. The next series no longer had the bolt heads in the middle. Now the bumper center extended out (even wider) and the recessed bolt heads were on the top and bottom. This gave more pushing surface without damage to the bolts.

1941 front bumper
1941 Front Bumper

1946 front bumper
1946 Front Bumper

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1947-53 Front Bumper
(COE and Conventional the same)

Ground Hogs and Dirt Floors

Monday, August 18th, 2014


We assume the increase population of these little 12 to 15 pound rodents in the past 20 years is due to stricter in-city zoning that does not allow dogs outside without some type of restraint.
Beware! Ground hogs (woodchuck) are on the hunt for a dry place out of the rain to call home. They love a dry dirt floor barn or related storage building. These rodents continually dig their tunnels throughout which is protection from possibly any predators. They have keen eye sight, even can see you 200 feet away, and run for a tunnel!
Look at this 1959 Chevrolet Napco 4×4 stored out of sight about 5 years. Ground hogs placed one of their tunnels under the front wheels. The trucks weight soon dropped it into a tunnel and the straight front axle is on in the dirt!

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But it’s my home!

1953 Chevrolet Radiator Cover

Monday, March 4th, 2013



One of the rarest Chevrolet dealer installed truck accessories of the 1950’s.  Charles Callis of Union City, Tennessee recently found this original radiator cover that he installs for shows on his 1953 1/2 ton.

Note the Chevrolet logo on the lower right side to prove it’s the real thing!

It is pictured in the 1949 Chevrolet Salesman’s Data Book on the Truck Accessory page.  Chevrolet describes it as:

“For all models of trucks.  Adjustable; constructed of Fabrikold.  Aids engine warm-up.
Protects engine from cold blasts.  Improves efficiency in stop-and-go operations.”

The thin oil cloth type material did not last long either on the truck or during off season in storage.  No doubt the dealer discarded his unsold stock in a few years.

You can contact Charles by email at:  charlespcallis@juno.com

Solving Bad Gasoline Problems

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Leaving your truck, car, or most all gasoline operated equipment in storage is asking for trouble!  Many of us, as hobbyists, collect more cars and trucks than we will drive at least monthly.  They sit in the back of your garage or are stored across town in a friend’s garage, barn, etc.

Three to five years later when it is time to move them, they usually won’t start.  You find in some cases, you cannot even get fuel to the carburetor.

After placing the blame on the carb, fuel pump, or filter, you finally (after hours of work) it comes down to bad gasoline.  How did this happen?

The answer is simple.  In today’s world ethanol is added to some gasoline as much as 10%.  It gives more fire power to the gasoline that has been reduced in octane partially with additives that help lower air pollution.

This ethanol (alcohol) is damaging to many rubber and neoprene seals in your fuel system.   Even worse, with the formula of modern gasoline plus ethanol, it will even change to sludge in your fuel system including the tank during long storage.  Additives placed in ethanol gas to prevent fuel deterioration is said to be effective not more than about 1 ½ years.

All this spells “Big Money” to clean your fuel system. Just taking your fuel tank out of your vehicle, having it cleaned at a radiator repair shop (there aren’t many of these businesses anymore) will cost a minimum of $300.00.

We recently visited a small engine repair shop where 30 hedge trimmers, chain saws, and weed whackers were waiting to be repaired.  The shop owner said 95% were there because of using gasoline with ethanol.

The answer to prevent this problem may be easier than you think.   If possible STOP using gasoline with ethanol in your vehicles that are rarely driven or started.  In our state, Missouri, there is no ethanol at many of the premium grade gasoline pumps http://e0pc.com/MO.php.  This maybe the answer in your area.  Check the gasoline pumps in your state and see if your premium gas is ethanol free.

Some of you may remember the days prior to the 1970’s when you bought a vehicle that had been sitting 5 to 10 years.  The gasoline smelled terrible but the motor would start.  If it had brakes, you could even drive around the block.  There was no alcohol in the gasoline.

Use premium gasoline in your stored vehicles or any yard equipment with limited use if it is without ethanol.

In Missouri, the approximately .20¢ extra per gallon for premium fuel far outweighs the headaches later!!

Solving Bad Gasoline Problems

Rear Bumper Options

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Ever wonder why GM pickup rear bumpers have been an option for so many years?



Beginning in 1951 these bumpers became an extra cost option and have remained this way ever since on most pickup models.

The reason relates to trucks being mostly for work. Though protecting the bed from minor rear damage, a bumper also kept the driver from backing up against a loading dock. GM found that many farmers and construction workers had been removing the rear bumper to get the truck flush against a dock. This eliminated most of the gap between the truck and dock. Broken legs of livestock and employees during loading were also greatly reduced.

The following picture is an example of a 1955 and newer GM step bed pickup. Its owner went against the current trend of adding the optional rear bumper during its restoration and kept his truck basic. It is important to note, that to protect the license plate bracket without a bumper, GM placed it on the left side. Holes are in the middle of the rear cross sill from the factory to make it easier for the dealer to install the rear center license plate bracket while adding the optional bumper.

Note the rear spare tire arm is at an angle to also protect it from damage if backing or being even lightly bumped in traffic.

This picture shows an optional right taillight. From the assembly line this truck would have only the left light with attached license bracket.

rear bumper options 1

Without optional bumper. Owner has added a right tail light. (above)

rear bumper option 2

Factory installed optional bumper including correct tail lights and license bracket (above)

New Cigarette Lighter

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Purchasing a 1947-1953 optional cigarette lighter assembly from some vendors provides reproduction that is far from original in appearance. A manufacturer recently offered the optional lighter assembly but used a knob from the headlight of a 1947-1953. There is no similarity to the real lighter!

Don’t be embarrassed at a show where your vehicle is being judged.

new cigarette lighter 1

Reproduction (above)

new cigarette lighter 2

Image of original (above)

Korean War Shortages

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Prices of more valuable metals such as copper and nickel reached their height during mid 1951 through 1953. Though U.S. shortages were much less than in WWII, there were price increases in the market that affected the financial bottom line of auto and truck manufacturers.

America almost demanded chrome on cars even if it raised prices. Decorative shiny trim was almost necessary to get buyers into the showroom.

Trucks were a different story! They were work vehicles. Eliminating the chrome extras did nothing to lessen the load capacity or operations off road. To keep the price down GM and other truck manufacturers removed much of the chrome and replaced it with paint. The steel stampings were the same, they were just painted. It was very necessary for GM’s base model to be priced low. City, county, federal, and many companies bought fleet trucks that offered the lowest price. Purchases had little to do with appearance. Even a $10.00 savings could make a sale.

The noticeable changes on GM light trucks is the lack of chrome on hub caps, grill bars, bumpers, and even the wiper knob. Stainless steel also felt the Korean War shortages. The deluxe five window pickup cab no longer had the stainless around the windshield and side windows. The glove box as well as the radio speaker horizontal trim was now painted steel. The deluxe panel truck with all its extra stainless side trim was now history.

By 1954 the chrome and stainless was back stronger than ever though some base models were kept in paint to hold their price low.

The following photos show just a few examples of GM’s Korean War era trucks. Considering their uses it doesn’t look too bad.

korean 1

korean 2

korean 3

korean 4

korean 5

First Series Chevrolet

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The 1955 year put Chevrolet on top! All stops were removed in announcing and continual advertising of the totally redesigned passenger car and their first V-8 engine. Television, radio, news papers and dealers regularly told the public that Chevrolets best year had arrived.

It was not good timing to also begin an equal advertising campaign for the totally new truck that was ready for manufacturing. A good business decision by GM was to wait about six months until the car ads had slowed, then advertising could begin again for their redesigned trucks. This would hit the customers twice in one year on major changes in the Chevrolet market.

It was unheard of for GM to not introduce a new Chevy vehicle each year, therefore at least something had to happen with trucks at the beginning of the 1955 model year. The answer was later called a “First Series 1955”. Chevrolet would introduce the 1955 truck by making several changes to their pre-existing 1954. With the new “Second Series” only months away, little investment was made to the early 1955 trucks.

First Open Drive Shaft

First Open Drive Shaft

The most noticeable change on the popular 1/2 ton was the first open drive shaft in Chevy’s truck history. This was actually created for the later 1955 trucks but with dealer demand it was moved up to be in the early body style. This major drive line change required a different 3 speed transmission, rear leaf springs, shift linkage and shift box.

1955 Hood Side Emblem

1955 Hood Side Emblem

The outside visual changes were minimum. During the about 5 months production, the 1955 early truck was given totally different hood side emblems. However, to reduce costs the number portion of the emblem could be changed depending on the size of trucks. Example: 3100 on 1/2 ton, 3600 on 3/4 ton and 3800 on the 1 ton.

Vertical Stripes

Vertical Stripes

A no cost difference was changing the vertical stripes on the front hood emblem from red on the 1954 to white on the 1955

Non-Chrome Grill

Non-Chrome Grill

The paint arrangement on the non-chrome grill was also a non cost change for Chevrolet. The grill bars were changed from body color to white.

Dash Color

Dash Color

Interior paint (again a no cost change) was slightly modified from a pearl beige color 1954 to a light metallic brown.

Thus, with little extra investment Chevrolet had a new truck for the beginning of 1955. This was the final offering of this body style that began in 1947. GM referred to it as the “Advance Design”. It has become one of Chevrolet’s all time greats. It’s popularity today is as strong with hobbyists as it was with new buyers 50 years ago.

Then came the totally re-designed trucks in mid-year 1955. That will be another story!

Accessories vs Options

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

As per GM, accessories during the 1930’s through mid 1960’s were the extra cost items sold and installed by the approved dealer. The truck was prepared for these during production so the dealership could later add them with less effort.

As much as possible GM would punch holes, attach removable plates, press in dimples, etc. to help the dealership in placing the accessory in just the right position. Several accessories using the pre-placed holes or dimples in these early Chevrolet and GMC trucks are the right side taillight bracket, fresh air heater, radio, front bumper guards, cigarette lighter, arm rest, glovebox light, and windshield washer.

Options were added at the factory. They were more difficult to install by individual dealerships and were therefore placed on the vehicle during production. This included items such as a chrome grille, 4 speed transmission on 1/2 and 3/4 ton chassis, double action shocks, tinted windows on 1953-55, two speed rear axle on larger trucks, double action fuel pump, hydrovac power brake, etc.

1954 GM Transition Year

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

This was one of the most unique years for Chevrolet trucks. The Korean War and some resulting material shortages were now history. The economy was growing and the average worker brought home more wages than ever before. Sales of luxury options on automobiles were showing definite increases.

To capitalize on this trend for transportation improvements, GM was fast working on total new automobile and truck models for the coming year. When introduced, the result would be record sales which put General Motors even further above it’s competitors.

But what about the 1954 year for GM trucks? Waiting buyers had the demand for a new updated truck but the tooling was not yet complete. Other competitive truck manufacturers were beginning to offer many deluxe features.

Therefore, General Motor’s 1954 answer to temporarily satisfy new truck buyers was a major facelift of the prior models. To keep costs down, GM continued to use the basic cab introduced in mid-1947. To update this seven year old design, an enterprising engineering department added items such as a modern one piece curved windshield, completely redesigned dash board, and created a totally different grill. All this while keeping almost identical hood, fenders, bumpers, running boards, seats, doors, etc.

Another big first for 1954 Chevrolet truck cabs was the optional color coordinated interior and the two tone exterior. This had never been offered before by GM on truck cabs. Advertisements defined it as “The Bold New Look”. For an extra cost (only on cabs with rear quarter windows), the customer could order interior color combinations including two tone blue, gray and maroon, two tone green, plus dark and light brown. Each of these four base color combinations were harmonized with the headliner, floor mat, door panels, windlace, arm rest, and interior sheet metal. Pearl beige was the standard color on non optioned cabs.

This deluxe two tone interior package was introduced in mid year. Therefore, it is not shown in early 1954 Chevrolet truck brochures and many perfectionists do not know it was available later.

The above mentioned colored floor mats also added little to GM’s investment when they produced quantities.  These have never been reproduced.  Note:  For the perfectionist that requires all extras for the 1954 deluxe pickup, we have heard that a restorer spray painted his new black floor mat with flexible rubberized paint used on newer automobile exterior front and rear bumpers.

Here is another very exclusive item on the 1954-55 deluxe pickup were their armrests: These were not found on other GM vehicles. The more basic pickup still used the arm rest introduced in 1947. See our tech article & photos on these arm rests. They came in the four door panel colors so both could be correctly coordinated.

The two tone exterior paint option included a white top only (shell white) and only on the deluxe cab. For the short run in 1955 of this body design (first series), the two tone was still with only a white top but the shade was changed to Bombay Ivory.

Another very unusual feature, that cost GM no extra, was colored running boards.  They matched the lower body color.  On standard and prior years, the boards were black.

With fears of Korean War shortages now over, chrome and stainless steel could now be offered again as part of a long option list. On the deluxe model this included stainless exterior window trim plus chrome hub caps, grill and bumpers.

The option list also increased greatly for the 1954 year with new items available not offered during previous years. Examples were full wheel covers, electric wiper motor, automatic 4 speed transmission, ride control seat, day-night inside rear view mirror, etc.

It is also important to remember that for 1954, Chevrolet chose to introduce two major items and not wait for the totally new later 1955 models. This was the high pressure insert bearing six cylinder engines and the deeper restructured pickup bed. Thus, the 1954 shares both the early and late features and is a true “transition truck”.

At present, the 1954 GM light pickups, particularly the deluxe models are showing a fast increase in popularity among restorers. They stand out as a unique transition truck having various characteristics not associated in total with any GM commercial vehicle. It is felt their future pricing will also stay higher than either 1947 to 1953 or the 1955 to 1959 models in equal condition. Of course, all older GM trucks are on their way to the top in popularity and value. They are to restorers “the Model A’s of a New Generation”.

1954 gm transition

Lost Engine Numbers

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

GM trucks titled prior to the mid-1950’s were usually registered using the stamped engine number not the body digits pressed in the door ID plate. This practice has created many problems in later years as states became stricter in titling.

Unfortunately, many older vehicles outlast their engine and owners rarely rebuild the originals. To save time and certainly expense, a rebuilt unit or a used one from another vehicle would often be installed. This worked great until years later when state safety inspections began or the vehicle was sold out of state. With a prior engine transplant, there was no ID numbers that would match the title.

Even today, this problem occurs as older trucks with different engines are pulled out of barns and from the property line of a farmer’s back field.

Lost Bumper Bolt

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

On 1937-55 1/2 and 3/4 ton rear bumpers there exists an unused center square bumper bolt hole that sometimes brings up questions from restorers. “Why does this hole exist and what is it purpose?” The answer relates to the attitude toward trucks during those years. They were for work and keeping their production cost low was a priority.

The bumpers during 1937-47 were the same front and rear. The center hole at the front held a vertical steel bracket which was needed if the truck was hand cranked. Rather than make a 4 hole rear bumper, GM simply used their front on the rear. Even in 1947-55 with a slightly different horizontal shape, the factory 5 hole punch was used on front and rear. Therefore, the rear bumper hole has no purpose. To cover this hole, GM produced a special bumper bolt that has become very rare. To save costs (it is a surprise that anything was used) GM created a one inch long stud held in place with a sheet metal speed nut. It has no threads and its head is covered with a stainless cap so it looks like the other bumper bolts from a distance.

Most of these original rare filler bolts will have dents and scrapes on the stainless cap. A skilled person can place a new stainless cover from a more common replacement bolt and make this rare unit look like new.

lost bumper bolt

GMC 1/2 Ton Long Bed

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Of the many differences between the Chevrolet and GMC 1/2 ton during the early years (1936-54), the GMC offering of a long bed pickup box was one of the more noticeable. Only GMC provided this option. To obtain this extra bed length on a Chevrolet, the buyer ordered a 3/4 ton.

This difference existed with the first GMC pickup in 1936 and continued through the end of the Advance Design series in 1955. Possibly the reasoning for this was the horsepower difference between these two marquis. The base 216 six cylinder Chevrolet engine provided 92 hp. The standard 228 GMC six boasted 100 hp.

To get the approximately nine inch extra GMC chassis length not only were the two frame rails longer but the drive shaft was extended. GMC engineers did this by developing an extension which was the connecting length between the standard short bed closed drive shaft and the rear of the transmission. None of this interchanges with a Chevrolet and both makes use a totally different drive shaft design on their 3/4 ton series.

The adjacent photo shows this unique connector link installed in its GMC. A 7 3/8 inch steel jack-shaft is surrounded by a cast iron housing (it is still a closed drive shaft) and includes an extra u-joint, bearing, and seal. Though, a strongly built drive shaft system, this portion becomes the long bed 1/2 ton’s weak link after 50 years of use and abuse. Without a doubt this link has performed almost flawlessly beyond the miles expected by its designers. However, it does have its long term limitations. The many prior miles, lack of regular maintenance, and occasionally overloading the truck makes the failure of an original in today’s world a definite possibility. Watch for sources for the rare replacement parts in this connector link just in case. Otherwise surprise damage in this area can keep your GMC 1/2 ton long bed out of service for quite some time.

long bed 1

long bed 2

long bed 3

Home Made Garage

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

When you would like to restore your truck and no workshop is available, there is a solution. Most all the repairs can occur in a temporary shop and at a very low cost.

Jim Valano of Marion, Indiana is a true example of ‘American Ingenuity.’ He purchased a ‘canvas storage tent’ and assembled it at a convenient location. He even made the floor using the backside of used carpet on top of sheet plastic. Its roll-up sides are adjusted for the weather.

Jim’s 1957 Chevrolet ½ ton is now almost restored and most of the work occurred in this canvas enclosure. It can later be removed and stored in the original box.

If you need a building for your restoration, this may be your answer. Just check with your city for possible zoning restrictions!

home made garage 1

home ,ade garage 2

home made garage 3

Screw On ID Plates

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

screw on ID plates

The body I.D. plate – every GM truck had one attached at the factory. Basically it states the vehicle’s gross weight limit (weight of truck plus its maximum allowed load) plus stamped digits that give the assembly plant year, size of truck, month built, and sequential numbers as it came off the production line. These plates are necessary for positive vehicle identification.

A unique characteristic of the 1950 and older GM truck is that the I.D. plate was not riveted at the factory but rather held in place by two small clutch head screws with a hexagon perimeter. Thus a wrench or a clutch driver can tighten or remove them.

Over the years if the two screws begin to loosen, the owner would either retighten them from time to time or often remove the plate for safe keeping. Usually this plate stayed in the glove box or at home and just never got reattached. Thus we find some of these pre-1951 GM trucks with no I.D. plates. In the early years this was often of little concern as most trucks were titled on the engine number.

After 1950 these I.D. Plates were riveted to the door post. Probably not so much to prevent vehicle theft (we lived in a different era) but just to keep them from being lost.

In today’s world this can cause big problems in registering particularly if the transfer is to another state and an I.D. number verification is necessary. Even if the I.D. plate remains secure with screws as it left the factory, a problem may still exist. Unfortunately most inspectors today weren’t even born when these trucks were built. Sometimes an officer refuses to OK the truck, saying that I.D. plates do not come with attaching screws and it is not legal. You now have an uphill battle with an inspector that really believes he is correct.

Yes, you can attach this original scratched and painted-over I.D. plate with rivets. However, what is this inspector going to say when he sees this worn and painted on I.D. plate attached with two new shinny pop rivets? Have you ever been accused of car theft? It is then you wish the truck was titled to the engine!

Remember, on a left hand drive truck (1947-55) the I.D. plate attached to the left door post. It is attached to the opposite side on the right hand drive truck. The two holes for the plate screws or rivets are punched at the factory in both door posts.

Trees and Trucks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

There couldn’t be an easier place for a tree to grow. If you don’t move your truck for a few years, trees will find it. As they grow wider, the truck bends to fit!

Here livestock cannot eat the first growth.  Lawn mowers can’t reach it.

It’s free to grow.

tree trucks 1

 

tree trucks 1

trees trucks 2

trees trucks 3

trees trucks 3

The Finale

In this example this small young tree sensed the light coming through the square bumper bolt hole and grew in that direction.

It went on through the hole and continued it’s growth. All was growing good until a weed sprayer came on the scene.

Compliments of Jerry’s Chevy Restoration Shop. Independence, Missouri.

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White Wall Tires

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Prior to the 1960’s, trucks were used as work vehicles. On Friday nights, most were parked for the weekend and the family sedan was the transportation vehicle.

It was a conservative era when you bought only basic necessities. A $5.00 grocery purchase was more than most could carry. Finding white wall tires on a truck (even a car) would have been a rare sight, indeed. Very few cars, except for most luxurious models, would have had white walls even as an option. It should be remembered, that most roads, except highways and those in the main part of town were gravel, dirt, or sprayed annually with tar.

Of course, a dealer would have been happy to install aftermarket white wall tires, if the customer made a specific request. For a price, the dealer would provide any option to keep a satisfied customer and make a few dollars.

On GM trucks, white walls became a factory option in mid-1955, partially because of the introduction of the Chevrolet Cameo and GMC Suburban carrier and also due to more roads becoming paved. These very deluxe pickups, as well as several of the other well appointed 1/2 tons justified a white wall tire for those wanting it all!

Almost none of these deluxe models would have been given their second set of white wall tires. By then, the pickup was older and being used more as a hauler, not for appearance.

Buy Parts for 1934 to 1946 Trucks

 

Rocker Panel Moulding Instruction

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Yes the cabs are the same between 1/2 ton and 2 ton on the 1955-1959, however one extra does exist on the 1 1/2 and 2 tons. These larger trucks have an additional rocker panel! Their panels are held to and cover the regular rocker under each door with nine sheet metal screws. They even extend from the under door area to along the edge of the cab corner.

Check this page from the 1955-1959 Chevrolet Factory Assembly Manual printed in those years.

Tip submitted by Graeme and Helen Howden of New Zealand.
Email howdens@slinshot.com.nz

Their 1956 Chevrolet 2 ton had them missing and the truck was obviously lacking something. They discovered the problem when they found this page during their research.

Click image to enlarge

Step Panel Moulding Instruction

1954 Rear Bumper

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In 1954, GM introduced their new deeper improved stepbed. With this design the optional rear bumper required the license to be moved to the center. This eliminated clearance problems between the bumper and the left side mounted license plate.

To save the creation of a totally new rear bumper, GM placed a dip in their pre-existing 1947-1953 unit. This was necessary to allow for complete viewing of the license in its new position.

The following picture shows the correct bumper with a good view of the license plate. The other pictures are of the earlier bumper on a 1954. Only a portion of the license is visible.

1954 bumper 1

Earlier incorrect bumper on a 1954 (above)

1954 bumper 2

Earlier incorrect bumper on a 1954 (above)

1954 earlier bumper 3

Correct 1954 Bumper (above)