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Windows

Window Handle Escutcheon 1929-38

Friday, February 19th, 2016

During the early years of Chevrolet truck production the complete door panels were painted sheet metal with no upholstery. The inside window handle needed to be out away from the door panel. This would guarantee that over the years wear in the riser mechanism would not allow the handle to rub on the panel surface as the door window handle was raised and lowered.

To keep the handle secure and better protect the riser mechanism from excess wear, Chevrolet added an escutcheon. This is very important for those reasons.

NOTE: The second photo. The excutcheon is correctly accepting the original handle. This handle is being balanced by a non related fastener.

 

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1939-46 Panel Truck Rear Windows

Friday, October 11th, 2013

General Motors made it very simple to replace the two small windows in the rear doors of these early panel trucks.  It made it especially fast on the factory assembly line.

Simply place the rubber seal (now available from full stocking early GM Truck Dealers) around the pre-cut glass.  Press into the inside window opening. Three special clips secure it in place. It could not be easier! See Photos.

Oops, one big problem. If you don’t have the special clips, Good Luck!
This 1941 Chevrolet Panel Truck owned & totally restored by Jim Winters, Rochester, Minnesota.


Outside of door

Inside of Door

Ghost Windows

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The door window is cranked up tight in the cloth channel and off you go on your daily errands. Suddenly, the glass begins to slowly lowers as you drive over side roads or contact a rough surface. In comes cold air, rain, and wind! Even the window handle turns. What’s this all about? Do you tape the window closed or wire the handle so it will not turn?

You have a window regulator spring problem! This large 2″ diameter round spring has either broken or become disconnected.

With no spring tension on the regulator, the weight of the glass creates the lowering of the support arm and window. Sorry, there is no good fix other than removing the regulator from inside the door. The picture below shows this circular Clock spring. It must be large to hold the weight of the glass panel.

ghost window

Swing Out Military Windshield, 1936-1946 Chevrolet and GMC

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During the early years of auto and truck design, most vehicles came with their windshields capable of tipping outward. This helped poorly insulated cabs to be more bearable during hot weather. Extra outside air would be forced into the cab and replaced some of the hot air radiating from the bare sheet metal firewall.

This idea was good but not without a few problems. Unfortunately, air movement depended on the speed of the vehicle. The faster the driving, the more air circulation. Too bad for the driver in stop and go city traffic during a hot summer day.

In GM trucks, water leaks into the cab developed as the rubber edge seal began to age. The under dash crank-out gear assembly (1936-46) was not easily reached and therefore almost never received lubrication. The gear would wear and later most became non-usable. It was then necessary to close the windshield frame permanently and the cab lost a major method of getting air flow on hot days.

The system was expensive to produce! A pair of swing hinges, a crank-out assembly, and two windshield halves added to production costs.

This windshield vent system was stopped with the introduction of the 1947 Advance Design cab. The two piece windshield now became permanently sealed. An insulated interior fire wall pad was standard. A left side cowl vent intake door forced outside air over the drivers feet and lower legs. (Of course, this was also when the truck was moving.)

A top cowl vent door (also on earlier trucks) now had a screen to prevent entry of insects. Thus, this was the end of the swing-out windshield. They were a great help on hot days when the vehicle was moving, but inevitable gear wear began a new set of problems for later years.

NOTE: During World War II, the military using civilian cabs on their larger trucks had no patience for this crank-out assembly. They wanted no malfunction in the open position while being in a Russian or German winter. They even placed the windshield hinges on the roof for less complicated repairs in the field.

Therefore, the military went back to the swing out windshield frame design that opened manually by the driver. This system was used on all 1936 and older High Cab Chevrolet trucks, Model A Fords, and so many other early automobiles that needed more ventilation. See Photos.

WWII Cab 9

WWII Cab 5

WWII Cab3

1939-1946 Door Windows

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

During 1939-40 Door window breakage on truck cabs became a problem. As the cloth fabric in the door window channel became worn, the large and now loose fitting side windows were susceptible to cracking when the door was slammed. Complaints from dealers resulted in an improvement on 1941-46 doors. A one piece metal frame was placed around the edges of the top and sides of the glass and the breakage was greatly reduced. To make room for these new metal frames, the glass on the 1941-46 doors was now slightly smaller.

Therefore, the 1939-40 door glass and 1941-46 with metal frame will interchange in total in all 1939-46 doors. The smaller 1941-46 door glass can not be used without it’s frame or it will not seal into the cloth channel at the top of the window opening.

1939 door window