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Home Remedies

Squeaky Glass

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


Silence loose, squeaky windshields and rear windows with a little ordinary talcum powder. Run a nail file around the rubber gasket that holds the glass in place. As you pry the rubber away, sprinkle the powder between the gasket and the glass.

Want Additional Gauges?

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


Many car owners have difficulty in obtaining housings to suit their gauges if they are not to be located in the dashboard. The caps from spray cans (plastic or metal) will serve this purpose. If you don’t want to cut new holes in the dash, mount extra gauges under the dash and in the hole left by a discarded clock.

Nuts Molded from Epoxy Cement

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


The next time you can’t find a nut to fit a special bolt, try making your own by filling an oversized nut with epoxy cement and molding the threads. Seat the nut in modeling clay before pouring in the epoxy. Grease the bolt, then screw it down through the epoxy into the clay. Wait a day, unscrew the bolt from the hardened epoxy, and you will have a perfect fitting nut for moderate duty.

Hide the Key

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


Need a good spot for the spare key? Take the workings out of the cigarette lighter, fill it with epoxy glue and stick the key handle into it. Disconnect the wires to the lighter and remove the back of the socket. The knob now keeps the key handy, but still looks like a lighter, fooling potential thieves but keeping the key handy.

Greasing UNI Joints

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


Packing a universal joint is easy if you follow this procedure. When the joint is disassembled, wipe out as much of the dirty grease in the cap and cross as you can reach with a clean rag. Then fill the cup with clean grease and force it back on the cross shaft, twisting it back and forth with the palm of your hand. The dirty grease will be forced out and can be wiped away. Repeat until the grease comes out clean. Now you can fill the reservoir and reassemble the universal joint.

Broken Key Removal

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011


A broken off key in a door, trunk lid, or ignition lock need not be a problem even if it is invisible. Hunt up an old jigsaw blade, twist it so that its teeth will mesh with the key, and insert it in the lock. Pull out the blade, and the missing piece of key will come with it.

Rattling Gear Lever

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A rattling gear lever can be quietened by slipping on a rubber sleeve. A handy sort is the sleeve of a bath tub sprayer that fixes on to a ordinary tap

Rattling Gear Lever

Coil Testing

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Wiring procedure for temporarily attaching a coil to test an older one

Coil Testing

Compressing Valve Springs

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

This is a custom made tool for the compression of valve springs so that the push rod can be easily removed, each application will vary. The illustration should give you an idea on how the system works

valve spring compression

Fuel Line Blockage

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Air pressure to clear fuel line blockage. This is an old mechanic trick of attaching a tube valve to half a rubber ball as seen in the illustration. Cut the ball to suit the fuel filter neck. Disconnect the line at the fuel pump so you don’t clog internal filters in the pump or carburetor. Don’t apply too much pressure as you may damage the tank

fule line blockage

Valve Spring Test

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Valve quick spring test. To ensure valve springs in use are of the correct strength and have not weakened with age, they should be checked against a new one. The two springs should be placed in a vice as shown. If the used spring compresses before the new one starts to it has lost its strength and should be replaced by a new one

Valve Spring Test

Side View Mirror Longevity

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Side view mirrors last longer if a thin line of clear lacquer is painted around the edge of the glass where it meets the metal. This keeps moisture from getting behind the glass and also helps prevent the mirror from loosening and rattling. You can also use clear nail polish varnish.

mirror longevity

Head Gasket Leaks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A head gasket leak can be checked for leakage by adding a couple of teaspoonfuls of washing blue to a cup of anti freeze and pouring the mixture into the radiator. Tie a cloth over the tail pipe and run the engine. If there’s a leak the blue will stain the fabric. The anti freeze will help to locate the leak

head gasket leak test

Steering Ball Joints and Greasing

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Older type steering usually have a number of ball joints similar to those illustrated. They must be regularly greased and adjusted or they will wear to the point that the ball will slip out of the spring tensioned cups. Once this happens you will have either part steering or no steering at all

Steering Ball Joints and Grease

Tubeless Tire Repair

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Repair your own tubeless tires? You can seat the beads against the wheel rim so they’ll hold air by applying a rope tourniquet around the tire. When partial inflation expands the tire, remove the rope and inflate to recommended pressure

tubless tire repair

Shielding Starter Cables to Prevent Short Circuits

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Instead of tying up the starter cable to keep it from shorting against the motor or other metal parts of the car, when it is removed to repair the starter, just slip a short piece of rubber hose or tubing over the terminal end. Then you can let the end of the cable drop without any possibility of running down the battery.

Protect Chrome

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Studebaker recommends a mixture in the ratio of 1/4 pound of beeswax to 1 quart of turpentine as very effective in protecting chromium plated parts against salt air and other conditions which have a detrimental effect on these parts. This protection is particularly recommended for cars in storage. It has been found that even after the car is taken from storage and the protective coating removed, some of it remains on the chromium and provides continued protection. March 15, 1935. After wax has been applied to a car and is ready for polishing, you will get a brilliant shine if you dip the cloth lightly in a container of corn flour. This is a tip from old time car detailers.

Corn Flour and Bees Wax

Static Electricity

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

If static electricity gives you a jolt each time you touch chrome door or window handles, apply a coat of thinned white shellac over the metal. The shellac will act as insulation and, incidentally, will protect the metal handles and keep them bright. However, in today’s world, to solve this static electricity build up, you can buy very good clear lacquers in pressure pack cans. Remove the offending chrome handles and treat accordingly or fit an earth strap.

static electricity

Removing Rivets

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

In removing rivets by center punching and drilling, the drill sometimes works off center, thus spoiling the rivet hole. A jig like the one shown will guide the drill true, as well as eliminate the need for center punching the rivet. It is made by welding two lengths of round stock of suitable size at right angles, one to be used as a handle and the other, of slightly larger diameter, to be used as the guide. The latter is drilled to size, a chip clearance hole is made near the lower end, and the bottom edge is countersunk to fit over a rivet head in sealing the guide.

removing rivets

Points on the Relay

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

The points on the relay switch in the circuit breaker between the generator and battery often become roughened and stick together when the motor stops. This causes a reverse flow of electricity from battery to generator, resulting in a dead battery. Filling these points usually will eliminate bothersome sticking.

Points on the Relay

Wooden Blocks

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A pair of rounded wood blocks anchored to a sloping driveway will keep a car from rolling away. The blocks should be gently rounded so they are easy to run over, yet at the same time just steep enough to hold the car when it is parked.

wooden blocks

Help with Mirrors

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

To help you see beneath the manifolds when installing plugs in new V8’s, fasten an old rearview mirror to a husky magnet. Place it on the frame with the mirror aimed at the plug openings and you can work without feeling your way.

help with mirrors

Quick Oil Filter Check

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

To check an oil filter quickly, feel the temperature of its housing after warming the engine. If the housing feels substantially cooler than the oil pan, the cartridge is dirty and oil is by passing it. Change it as soon as possible.

quick oil check

Greasing

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Greasing truck shackles, in particular rear shackle pins that take weight and dust constantly. When no grease will flow, jack up the chassis to relieve the weight of the shackle pin, at the same time as greasing, tap the spring or shackle pin with a hammer. If that fails apply heat (oxy acetylene) directly on the blocked area, not too long or too hot, but enough heat to melt the dust and grease which is set hard, at the same time pump in grease. This method is not suitable on all grease points, especially ball joints that sit on nylon seats. What is nearly impossible to grease are the HQ style Holden steering crossover drag link ball joints. Any ideas on this as you cannot now buy a new drag link to overcome this fault?

Silicone Rubber Gaskets (From a tube) The radiator repair shops friend

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

This tip came from a radiator repairer who told us one of the most frequent causes of radiator tube blockage is the excessive use of silicone rubber for water pump and thermostat gaskets. The overflow or excess to the inside cannot be cleaned and eventually some of this will break free with the water flow and carry on into the radiator, in many cases lodging in the tubes and blocking them. Silicone rubber will not dislodge or dissolve once in the radiator and dismantling it is the only way of removing the silicone rubber from a blocked tube. Remedy, use proper gaskets with a good recommended gasket cement. The same can also apply where there is oil under pressure. Again use recommended gaskets and go easy on the silicone rubber in a tube.

Timing Light Tip

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Hook up a timing light quickly with a bent cotter pin. One leg of the pin slips into the distributor caps #1 sparkplug socket, the timing light cable clamps on the other. The distributor is often easier to reach than the plug.

timing light

Check the oil yourself

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Keep your oil pouring spout clean and ready to use by storing it in a plastic bag. Besides keeping dust and insects out of the spout, the bag will collect oil drippings, preventing a mess in the garage.

oil tip

Accessory Wiring Hint

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

How to use a ballpoint pen to pull wire through a body panel.

ball point pen tip

Bad Globe Sockets

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Dirty corroded sockets in tail lights, small parking lights and older type headlights can be cleaned with the end of a battery terminal brush rotated inside the socket. Turn the power off first. Any other brush of similar size will do.

bad global sockets

Battery Cables

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A 6 volt battery cable on a 12 volt car is okay, but be careful if you are putting a 12 volt cable on a 6 volt car. The diameter may be smaller and cause power losses in the lower voltage system. The reason is that the 12 volt cables carry less amperage for the same power output.

battery cables

Running Cool

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Gearbox and back axle will run cooler and give longer life if you clean the mud and grime off at regular intervals. Steam cleaning and painting is best, a going over at home with solvent, kerosene, or degreaser is okay also. The reason, mud and dirt acts as an insulator, keeping the heat inside.

running cool

Brake Bleeding

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Bleeding hydraulic brakes will be easy if you make yourself this rig. You will need a spare cap for the master cylinder. Solder a piece of 1/4 inch tubing into the hole drilled through the cap.

brake bleeding

Curtain Rod Gauge Measures Wheel Toe-In

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

A curtain rod of the telescoping type can be used to gauge the toe-in of an automobile’s front wheels. After straightening out the tips as shown in the drawing, adjust the rod to fit snugly between the inner rims of the two wheels at their front edges. By making the rod at the joint and repeating the process at the rear edges of the rims, you can accurately determine the amount of toe-in.

curtain rod aid

Hand Pump Tests Automatic Spark Adjustment

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

To provide suction for checking the adjustment of an automatic, vacuum operated spark advance on the distributor of a car, an ordinary tire pump can be used. Remove the ball, check valve from the base of the pump and reverse the position of the leather washer. Then when the handle is drawn upward, air will be sucked into the pump hose, creating a vacuum.

hand pump

Roller Skate Aids In Changing Heaving Tires

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

To lighten the task of changing a heavy tire, one truck driver carries an ordinary roller skate (or a skate board) in his tool kit and uses it as shown. The skate supports the weight of the tire leaving him free to slide the spare wheel in place. This can also be used when changing tires on a car. It makes it easier to manage a heavy wheel.

roller skate aid

Plumber’s Friend Removes Headlamp Lenses

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Headlight lenses on cars can be removed easily and with little danger of breaking them with the aid of a plumber’s friend, or force cup, generally employed for cleaning drains. After the vacuum cup has been pressed against the lens, the headlamp screw is removed and the lens lifted out.

plumbers friend

Heavy Stud Bolts Removed With Lathe Dog And Lever

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Machinists sometimes find stud bolts set so firmly that the ordinary wrenches and devices for removing them are insufficient. Under these conditions, a simple method is to attach a heavy lathe dog to the bolt, as shown, and apply an iron bar as a lever. Tremendous force can be applied in the way, and the bolt easily removed. By reversing the pull, the bolt can be set very firmly.

heavy stud bolt removal

Hood Silencers Made From Rubber Erasers

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Hood lacing that mats down and becomes hard with age often allows the hood to rub the body and cause annoying squeaks. Ordinary pencil erasers, notched as shown above and slipped under the lacing, will silence the noise. Pressure of the lacing is usually strong enough to keep the rubber silencers in place.

hood silencer

Economy Overloads

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Russell Webb of Bombala, NSW, is working on a 1950-51 International AL-110. He thought we would like to see how a previous owner solved his rear spring overload problems. Now there is a good use for old tires..

economy overloads

Twisted Drills

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

We have all heard of the expression, “you get what you pay for.” This is a drill bit from an attractive set found in one of those cheap stores that sell all Chinese stuff. The picture is worth a thousand words. A $5 drill bit is usually better than a $5 set of drill bits.

Twisted Drills

Rubber Cushion Protects Spark Plugs

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Rubber Cushion spark plugs

Because socket type spark plug wrenches sometimes break the porcelain around the plug as they are slipped on or off, cut a short piece of rubber hose to fit snugly inside the wrench. Forced into the tool so that it clears the lower shank that grips the base ofthe plug, the rubber hose within the hollow tool acts as a cushion to protect the plug’s porcelain insulator from accidental breakage.

Home Remedies

Friday, February 11th, 2000

In the U.S., at least during the 1930’s through much of the 1950s, money was a scarce commodity. Times were tough for most Americans. For many, paying someone to work on their truck or car was not an option. If you owned a vehicle, you or a close friend often became the mechanic.

Out of necessity, home remedies were invented using everyday household equipment. We hope you will find it interesting to see some of the repair techniques used by your grandparents during a different economic time.

The repair remedies are from Restored Cars. This excellent bi-monthly Australian magazine features special cars and trucks of earlier years. They can be contacted by calling 011-61-3-5476-2592.